Friday Reads: Nolo Guides

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

Do you feel the chill in the air?  Autumn isn’t far away.  Kids are heading back to school.  It is a good time to turn your attention to those serious matters that you put on hold for the summer, like planning your retirement, long-term healthcare, your estate or will, or on a happier note, getting a patent or starting a new business.

The library has a collection of books published by Nolo, which has been publishing do-it-yourself legal guides, since 1971. Their website, Nolo.com, states: “Consumers and small business owners can handle many legal matters themselves with Nolo’s do-it-yourself products, which range from online forms and software to books and eGuides. All are written in plain English, with step-by-step instructions that help you get the job done.”   Their mission is “to help consumers and small businesses find answers to their everyday legal and business questions.”

With that in mind, I want to show you all of the titles that we have purchased in the last several months.   I hope you can make good use of them and take care of those legal issues with confidence.

101 Law Forms for Personal Use

8 Ways to Avoid Probate

Becoming a U.S. Citizen:  a guide to the law, exam and interview

Chapter 13 Bankruptcy: repay your debts

Effective Fundraising for Nonprofits

The Employer’s Legal Handbook

Estate Planning Basics

Everybody’s Guide to Small Claims Court

Every Landlord’s Guide to Finding Great Tenants

Get it Together:  organize your records so your family won’t have to

How to Form a Nonprofit Corporation

How to Write a Business Plan

Incorporate Your Business

IRAs , 401 (k)s  & Other Retirement Plans:  taking your money out

A Legal Guide for Lesbian & Gay Couples

Long-Term Care:  how to plan & pay for it

Make Your Own Living Trust

Making it Legal:  a guide to same-sex marriage, domestic partnership & civil unions

Neighbor Law:  fences, trees, boundaries and noise

Nolo’s Essential Guide to Divorce

Nolo’s Guide to Social Security Disability

Patent it Yourself

Plan Your Estate

The Public Domain:  how to find copyright-free writings, music, art & more

The Quick & Legal Will Book

Represent Yourself in Court

Books About Ephemera on The Point

Mindy and Jill were delighted to be joined today by Ken Gloss of the Brattle Book Shop located in Boston. Ken arrived with piles of ephemera, and below you will find the books that Jill mentioned, with a few bonus titles. If you are interested in local postcards, check out our digital Robert C. Hunt Postcard Collection, and for menus drop by the New York Public Library Lab’s historical menu collection! Miss the show? You can listen online!

Encyclopedia of Ephemera: a guide to the fragmentary documents of everyday life for teh collector, curator, and historian by Maurice Rickards

Important Artifacts and Personal Property from the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewlery by Leanne Shapton

Swimming Studies by Leanne Shapton

The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt: a novel in pictures by Caroline Preston

S. by J. J. Abrams and Doug Dorst

Richard Nickel: Dangerous Years: What He Saw and What He Wrote by Richard Cahan & Michael Williams

Scrapbooks: an American history by Jessica Helfand

No Time For ..

The Postcard Age: selections from the Leonard A. Lauder Collection by Lynda Klich and Benjamin Weiss

Urgent 2nd Class: creating curious collage, dubious documents, and other art from ephemera by Nick Bantock

Vintage Ephemera from the collection of Cavallini & Co. by Brian D. Coleman

 

Upcoming Fall Authors

The summer is nearly over, but things are going to be heating up soon with an exciting round of authors visiting the library this Fall. Free tickets are encouraged for Tess Gerritsen on Thursday, October 5. Registration is required for Creative Nonfiction: Writing and Publishing Your Essay with John D’Agata on Saturday, November 18.

Subscribe to the Books & Authors Newsletter to receive reminders and updates about upcoming author events. We look forward to having you!

Fall 2017 Schedule

Falmouth Reads Together Presents Atul Gawande

Date: Monday, September 25, 5:00pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Bestselling and acclaimed author Atul Gawande will talk to us about the importance of community as we age. Join us on Monday, September 25 at 5:00pm for a live simulcast with the author of Being Mortal. The author will not be visiting the library in-person; this will be a live simulcast event.

Request your copy of Being Mortal


Ruthless River with Holly Fitzgerald

Date: Tuesday, September 26, 6:30pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Holly Fitzgerald and her husband were on their honeymoon when their plane crashed in the Peru jungle. Hear about their adventure-turned-survival saga on Tuesday, September 26 at 6:30pm.

Request your copy of Ruthless River


I Know A Secret with Tess Gerritsen

Date: Thursday, October 5, 12:00pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Internationally bestselling author Tess Gerritsen recently released the 12th book in her Rizzoli & Isles series. Don’t miss Tess’s talk on Thursday, October 5 at noon. Pick up your free ticket at the Info Desk at the Main Library beginning on Saturday, September 30 at 10am. Limit of two tickets per person.

Get a ticket

Request your copy of I Know a Secret


Using What You Know to Write a Mystery with Sisters in Crime: Frances McNamara, Barbara Struna & Lea Wait

Date: Wednesday, October 11, 6:30pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Three sisters in crime, Frances McNamara (Death at the Paris Exposition), Barbara Struna (Old Cape Hollywood Secret), and Lea Wait (Tightening the Threads) will visit the library on Wednesday, October 11 at 6:30pm to help you find the clues to a novel only you can write. Been a housewife? Single parent? Lived in a creepy old house? You think your life’s been boring–but exciting plots are buried in your own expertise.


In Conversation with Hank Phillippi Ryan & Hallie Ephron

Date: Tuesday, October 17, 7:00pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Hank Phillippi Ryan (Say No More) and Hallie Ephron’s anticipated return to the library is on Tuesday, October 17 at 7pm. Hank will interview Hallie on her new book, You’ll Never Know Dear, and answer questions from the audience.

Request your copy of You’ll Never Know Dear


New England’s General Stores with Ted Reinstein

Date: Wednesday, November 1, 7:00pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Explore the fabric of America over hot coffee and penny candy. Step through the wooden doors of a New England general store and step back in time, into a Norman Rockwell painting and into the heart of America with Ted Reinstein on Wednesday, November 1 at 7pm.

Request your copy of New England’s General Stores: Exploring an American Classic


In Conversation with Jessica Keener and Anne LeClair

Date: Thursday, November 16, 3:30pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Jessica Keener, the author of Night Swim and a new historical thriller, Strangers in Budapest, visits the library on Thursday, November 16 at 3:30pm. She will be interviewed by Anne LeClair (The Halo Effect)

Request your copy of Strangers in Budapest


Creative Nonfiction: Writing and Publishing Your Essay with John D’Agata

Date: Saturday, November 18, 3:30-5:00pm   Location: Main Library, Hermann Meeting Room

Join John D’Agata for a creative nonfiction workshop that intentionally combines different forms of the genre—personal essays, travelogues, biographies—and encourages exploration in the genre. Participants will examine and discuss short 1-page essays, as well as receiving feedback on their personal essays. There will be also be some discussion on finding an agent and publisher, giving a reading, and surviving as a writer in the world.

An innovative essayist (Halls of Fame, 2001) and dynamic anthologist, (The Lost Origins of the Essay, 2009) John D’Agata is the author of Halls of Fame, About a Mountain, and The Lifespan of a Fact, as well as the editor of the 3-volume series, A New History of the Essay, which includes the anthologies The Next American Essay, The Making of the American Essay, and The Lost Origins of the Essay.

Registration is strongly encouraged; 15 seats available. Registration will begin on Wednesday, October 18.

Friday Reads: 1,001 Ways to Slow Down

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This week’s book, isn’t as much of a “good read,” as it is a “good contemplation”.  1,001 Ways to Slow Down:  a little book of everyday calm by Barbara Ann Kipfer is quite simply a numbered list of things to do or attitudes to adopt to help one lead a slower, more mindful life.  It is beautifully designed with a plethora of floral watercolor illustrations by Francesca Springolo, and an attractive font on high quality cream colored paper.   The chunky form gives the impression of holding a colorful little gem in your hands, that is meant to be enjoyed.

The author, who admits to having a “driven nature,” has selected quotes from famous people as diverse as Marcus Aurelius and Henry David Thoreau to augment her list.  As a practitioner of living slowly all of my life, I can attest to the usefulness of many items on her list, for example:

Unplug.

Watch autumn leaves parachute slowly out of trees and tumble gently across the landscape.

Speak with kindness.

Avoid making some decisions today.

Let a vehicle cut in front of you on the roadway.

 

Although, “Sing out loud!” would cause those around me to cry out in pain.

You can find this book on the new nonfiction shelf with the call number 158 KIP.

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Friday Reads: The Hemingway Thief

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

The Hemingway Thief by Shaun Harris

I am a fan of ‘hard-boiled’ crime novels, such as Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon, and I just read Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast, on which this novel is dependent.  So, there is no question why I enjoyed Shaun Harris’ The Hemingway Thief.  I laughed aloud at John Grisham’s expense, thoroughly enjoyed all of the literary references and got caught up in the rollicking adventure.  If you don’t mind the foul language and violence that goes along with the hard-boiled characters, then try out this buddy caper.  Reading A Moveable Feast first would help, but is not required.

This summary from the publisher will give you a taste of the style:

“Novelist Henry “Coop” Cooper is contemplating a new book between sipping rum and lounging on a Baja beach with hotel owner Grady Doyle.  When Grady tries to save a drunk from two thugs, Coop tags along for the sake of a good story.  The drunk is Ebbie Milch, a small-time thief on the run in Mexico because he has stolen the never-before-seen first draft of Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast from a wealthy rare book dealer. The stolen manuscript is more than just a rare piece of literary history. It reveals clues to an even bigger prize: the location of a suitcase the young, unpublished Hemingway lost in Paris in 1922.  A year’s worth of his stories had vanished, never to be seen again.  Until now.  But Coop and Grady aren’t the only ones with their eyes on this elusive literary prize, and what starts as a hunt for a legendary writer’s lost works becomes a deadly adventure.  For Coop this story could become the book of a lifetime . . . if he lives long enough to write it.”

You can find The Hemingway Thief on the Staff Picks Shelf, unless …

 

Friday Reads: I am of Cape Cod

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.   Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

I am of Cape Cod:  people and their stories, a new book by Chatham author John Whelan, seeks to portray a variety of people who call this beautiful peninsula home.  Beginning in Provincetown and working his way to the canal, Whelan highlights 139 people, from young to old, with different occupations and backgrounds.  Each person relates their connection to the Cape in a brief narrative and photographer Kim Roderiques expertly captures their character in thoughtful black and white photographs.  Bestselling author, Anne D. LeClaire (The Halo Effect and The Lavender Hour) wrote the introduction.

You can enjoy this book by flipping through and finding people that you recognize or you can read from start to finish and see the patterns that emerge as you travel from one end of the Cape to the other.   Henry David Thoreau is a common theme and beach photos abound.   Perhaps you’ll find a kindred spirit when you read someone’s testimony to this land.

We have two copies of this local hit.  While you wait for our circulating copy to work its way through the wait list, come to the reference room and peruse the reference copy.  While you’re at it, you can look at Succanessett Snapshot: the people and places that make Falmouth a community by Troy Clarkson or Legendary Locals of Falmouth by the Falmouth Historical Society.

Friday Reads: Rise of the Rocket Girls

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This week the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club discussed Rise of the Rocket Girls:  the women who propelled us, from missiles to the moon to Mars by Nathalia Holt.  Even though the we had a small group, only 5 as opposed to our typical 10, we had a spirited discussion and enjoyed many laughs while we dissected this interesting book.

Both a New York Times and a Los Angeles Times hardcover nonfiction best seller and an Amazon best book of April, 2016, Rise of the Rocket Girls tells the story of a tight-knit group of women who were human computers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California from the 1950s up to the present day.  Combining both the math and technology they worked with, as well as their personal lives, Holt aims to inspire women in the sciences by holding up these important, but little known women, as role models.

At a time when only 20% of women entered the work force and were limited to only a few occupations, which they had to leave when they became pregnant, this unusual group thrived in an intense and pioneering work environment.  Their every calculation needed to be done quickly and accurately.  They worked long, fast-paced hours, sometimes spending the night in the lab.  But somehow, some women still managed to keep a marriage afloat and raise a family too.   They were respected by the men at JPL for their accomplishments and eventually, as their roles changed from computing to designing, given the new titles of engineers.

If this sounds a bit like that movie that was nominated for three Oscars and won the Screen Actors Guild Award earlier this year, you are not entirely mistaken.  That movie was Hidden Figures and it was based on a book also about a group of women doing the same thing at the same time, but on the opposite coast.  Whereas the JPL group was primarily white with one black woman and a few Asian women, the Hidden Figures group was all black.

We will be reading Hidden Figures: the American dream and the untold story of the black women mathematicians who helped with the space race by Margot Lee Shetterly next and during our discussion on Thursday, September 7, we will also compare the two books.  If you would like to join us, pick up a copy of Hidden Figures at the reference desk.

 

 

Our New Friend Libby

It’s no secret how much I love e-audiobooks. I’ve been known to chat to anyone about them at the library and in my book clubs (and at the grocery store, the coffee shop, the laundromat…) They are just so easy to download and I’m a bit of a give-upper when it comes to confusing technological processes. That’s why I was excited when I heard that Overdrive released a brand new user-friendly app to use! Meet my new friend, Libby. Not only does Libby offer amazing audiobooks and ebooks for free with your library card, but it does it with a much more visually appealing and easy-to-navigate interface than before. Libby gives you the option of previewing audiobooks, whether or not they are immediately available, which is great for those of us who judge a book pretty quickly by its narrator.

If you’re tech savvier than I am, feel free to just head to your preferred app store and get going on Libby. If you think you might need more help, stop by the Info Desk in the Reference Room at the Main Library to ask us for help.

We are working hard to learn all about Libby and how it works. If you have any questions, please ask us and we will look for the answer together!

 

Celebrate Thoreau on Wednesday

In celebration of Henry David Thoreau’s Bicentennial, we are happy to welcome Geoff Wisner, editor of two books: “Thoreau’s Wildflowers” and “Thoreau’s Animals” to the Hermann Meeting Room at the Main Library on Wednesday, August 2, 2017 at 7:00pm.

In his lecture, Wisner will present Thoreau’s profound spirituality and belief in the earth-human connection as revealed through his explorations of Thoreau’s best nature writings. Wisner has contributed to publications including the Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor, Wall Street Journal, and Wild Earth. A graduate of Harvard University, he lives in New York City.

Many of the most vivid writings in Henry David Thoreau’s journals were inspired by the plants and animals that inhabit the sprawling fields, forests, and wetlands of Concord and nearby communities. An inveterate year-round rambler and keen and thoughtful observer, Thoreau wrote frequently about these creatures, faithfully recording each sighting or encounter with the accuracy of a scientist and the deep spirituality of a transcendentalist and mystic.

This event is free and open to the public. Registration encouraged.

Program Registration Form

    If your plans change, please contact us so we can make room for others. Please give us a call at (508) 457-2555 ext. 6 if you have any questions.
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Friday Reads: Book Club Central

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

Today’s post is a little different than usual as I’ll be highlighting a new website of interest to readers, rather than a book or magazine in our library.   Book club members read on … let me tell you about Book Club Central (www.bookclubcentral.org).

This website was created with the help of librarians (“Expert librarians,” according to the press release, but really, is there any other type of librarian?), to give the reading public an all-you-can eat buffet of helpful recommendations for a great book club.

Launched in late June by the American Library Association, this new resource boasts actress Sarah Jessica Parker as its honorary co-chair.  If you are wondering why, it is because Parker is also a library supporter and avid reader, dating back to her childhood.  Look for her book recommendations featured under the tab, “SJP Picks.”  Her first recommendation is No One is Coming to Save Us, by Stephanie Powell Watts (see photo.)

Under the tab, “How to Book Club,” leaders will find advice about what to have in mind when selecting books for a club, how to lead a great discussion and how to troubleshoot a book club gone awry.  Readers looking for a book club to join will get tips on places to search, such as their local library or book store.

The “Find Books for Clubs” tab is the place to go for the latest book recommendations, reviews and author interviews.  I will say here, that most recommendations are for novels and they don’t make it easy to find nonfiction book recommendations, but they do exist.

You can find Book Club Central at bookclubcentral.org, on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.