Friday Reads: Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of noted Massachusetts author, Henry David Thoreau.  In honor of his birthday, several Massachusetts organizations have banded together to create the Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read, a celebration lasting throughout the whole year in which every Massachusetts town is encouraged to offer an event “that brings community member together to read and contemplate a work by Thoreau.  This is the first Statewide Read in the commonwealth that will focus on one author. The Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read is part of a global celebration that highlights the continued relevance of Thoreau’s writings and philosophical contributions, even 200 years after his birth (July 12, 1817). His ideas about the significance of nature, civil disobedience, the power of individual action and deliberate living have influenced millions over the past two centuries.”1

Inspired by Thoreau’s custom of taking long walks in nature minutely observing plants and animals, this week, the Falmouth Public Library and the 300 Committee co-hosted a 3.5 mile nature walk around Long Pond in Falmouth lead by a member of the 300 Committee.  It was followed by a reading of Thoreau on Freedom and refreshments at the main library.  Walkers, and non-walkers who came for the reading portion, all enjoyed the opportunity to take a metaphorical walk in this great man’s shoes on the lovely first day of summer.

The Long Pond walk was so appreciated that there are some murmurings about possibly organizing another one in the fall at another time of the week so more people can come.  Keep your eye on our website or sign up for our newsletter to keep abreast of our programming.

On August 2, we are delighted to present a second Thoreau event with author, editor, book reviewer and contributor to publications, Geoff Wisner of the Boston Athenæum.  Wisner, who edited two new books, Thoreau’s Wildflowers (2016) and Thoreau’s Animals (2017), will discuss Thoreau’s spirituality and man’s connection to nature, drawing from Thoreau’s journals and other writings.

Until that time, if you would like to familiarize yourself with Henry David Thoreau, check out this list of selected titles we have at our library:

The Annotated Walden or Life in the Woods Together with Civil Disobedience

Cape Cod

Collected Essays and Poems

Journal

The Maine Woods

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

A Thoreau Gazetteer by Robert F. Stowell (a geographical guide to the writings of Thoreau)

 

1 “Lincoln Library Hosts Statewide Reading Event to Reflect on Thoreau” by Whitney Retallic, director of education for the Walden Woods Project, posted on Wickedlocal.com Feb. 1, 2017 and viewed on June 22, 2017.

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Teens Meet the Author

Join us for a reading, signing, and Q&A with YA authors Meagan Brothers and Cristina Moracho on Thursday, July 20, 2017 at 3:30pm. Meagan will be reading from her newest novel, Weird Girl and What’s His Name about two close friends Lula and Rory. A 2015 Kirkus Reviews Best Teen Book, this fresh LGBT YA novel speaks to anyone who has ever felt unwanted and alone, and who struggles to find their place in an isolating world. Cristina Moracho’s new book A Good Idea is about murder, betrayal, and a town with too many secrets.

Registration encouraged. Light refreshments will be provided free of charge.

Meagan Brothers is the author of the young adult novels Supergirl Mixtapes, which was a 2012 YALSA Best Fiction for Young Adults nomination, and Debbie Harry Sings in French, which was an ALA Best Book for Young Adults, won a GLBT Round Table ALA Award, and was named a New York Public Library Book for the Teen Age. A native Carolinian, Meagan currently lives in New York City. You can find her on Twitter @meaganbrothers

Cristina Moracho is a native New Yorker who received her M.F.A in fiction from Brooklyn College, where the first chapter of Althea & Oliver was awarded the Carole and Irwin Lainoff Award by acclaimed author Jim Shepard. She’s been a fellow at the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation in Taos, New Mexico, where she did not hear the Taos Hum but did attend a party at a solar-powered radio station. She writes about bad decisions and does all her own research. She lives in Brooklyn, where she works as a freelance writer and editor, is teaching herself to play the guitar and writing her next novel. You can find her on Twitter as @cherielecrivain.

Reviews of Weird Girl and What’s His Name by Meagan Brothers

They are called Weird Girl and What’s His Name Lula because she is from L.A. (an oddity in their small North Carolina town), and Rory because he is a self-described big fat guy who is easily made-fun-of-able. They are also obsessed with The X-Files. And did I mention they are best friends and that Rory is gay? The two are each other’s only friend, in fact, and they tell each other everything. Or so Lula thinks until she discovers that Rory hasn’t told her about his affair with Andy, his 40-something boss. Devastated, Lula runs away from home and toward, she hopes, a long-absent mother who abandoned her when she was 3. Will she find her mother? Will she return home? Will she and Rory reconcile? Answers are found in the book’s two halves: Rory tells the first half and Lula the second. Lula’s half drags, and the book is generally overlong, but the characters are wonderfully likable, the story is smartly written, and what’s this? there’s a possibility for a happy ending? Read and find out.– Booklist

 

Gr 6 Up-Rory and Lulu share an affinity for all things geek: The X-Files, Buffy, and conspiracy theories. When Lulu discovers that underage Rory had an explicit relationship with his divorced boss and hid it from Lulu because of her crush on him, she begins to question her own sexual orientation. After she is rebuffed by her favorite teacher, Lulu decides to hunt down the skeletons in her family’s closet. This buddy/misanthrope novel explores the difficulties in LGBTQ relationships, as well as teen angst in general. While the narrative is uplifting, some readers may have a hard time with the slow burn pace and minimal plot movement. The overuse of The X-Files as a metaphor for character complexity may keep some of the core audience at arm’s length. However, Brothers’s pitch-perfect dialogue and well-polished prose make her an author to watch. VERDICT Recommended for fans of realistic fiction with relationship drama and an LGBTQ focus.-Brian Hoff, Elmwood Park High School, IL, School Library Journal

Reviews of A Good Idea by Cristina Moracho

Gr 9 Up-When her parents split right before she started high school, Fin moved with her mom from the coastal Maine town of Williston to New York City. Now that she’s graduated, she’ll spend the summer, as she does every year, back in small-town Maine with her dad. This summer promises to be nothing like the others, however. Betty, Fin’s best friend since childhood, disappeared the previous fall, and Betty’s ex-boyfriend, Calder, confessed to drowning her but was let loose on a technicality. Soon after arriving in Maine, Fin discovers that everyone acts as if Betty never existed. Everyone, that is, except Serena, a teen who is trying to assuage her pain with pills and alcohol. With Serena, Fin finds both a sexual relationship and a partner to avenge Betty’s erasure. Together with Owen, an older local guy, they try to uncover what happened-and make Calder pay for it. While Moracho’s narrative offers elements of a murder mystery and a psychological thriller, it is not an edge-of-the-seat read. The novel’s real strength lies less in a suspenseful plot than in its subtle look into the dark places that minds, particularly those of teenagers on the brink of adulthood, can go and the different factors that can drive them there. VERDICT While this title will appeal to mystery fans, its best audience will be older teens seeking a well-written tale of a summer of downward spirals and small-town characters. -Jill Heritage Maza, Montclair Kimberley Academy, NJ, School Library Journal

Calder Miller confessed to the murder of Betty Flynn. Yet, as a minor without a present lawyer and the son of Williston’s manipulative mayor he walked free. But Finley Blake, Betty’s best friend, is ready to settle the score. Slitting tires, sparking fires, and doggedly interrogating classmates and locals alike, Finley demands nothing short of the truth: why did Calder do it? While her perilous ploys successfully bring Betty, a mercurial force with a long tarnished reputation, to the forefront of Williston’s clouded memory, they also unearth a series of startling secrets. Finley soon finds herself and those she cares most about haunted not only by danger but also boundless uncertainty. Finley’s brooding first-person narrative, precocious and often deluged with drug use, doesn’t always accommodate deep secondary-character development. Still, Moracho’s setting, a sleepy coastal town swathed in superstition and sea, shines. Edgy, atmospheric, and sometimes steamy, this is a thoughtful portrait of grief and an engaging examination of the risks we take for the ones we love. Ideal for mystery enthusiasts and noir newcomers.– Booklist

 

 

Friends Book Sale

We’re happy to announce that the Friends of the Falmouth Public Library will be having their annual Book Sale this July between July 1-6! Most books are under $2 and you are sure to find something special for yourself or a loved one. The book sale will be held on the library lawn in front of the Main Library.

Book Sale Schedule

The sale starts on Saturday, July 1 and runs until Thursday, July 6, 2017.

Saturday, July 1: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sunday, July 2: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Monday, July 3: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Tuesday, July 4: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Wednesday, July 5: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Thursday, July 6: 10:00 am – Noon

For more information about the Friends, visit their page.

Books & Authors Festival

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2017 Books & Authors Festival

The Falmouth Public Library and Eight Cousins Bookstore are proud to present the second annual Books & Authors Festival. The Festival will be held between July 13 – August 29. Celebrate the wonderful community of local authors on the Cape, meet bestselling authors, including Anita Diamant, and hear from recognized debut author Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich, plus many more.

All of our events are free and made possible by the Board of Trustees at the Falmouth Public Library. In addition, all events will be held in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room at the Main Library. Copies of the authors’ books will be available for purchase and signings will follow.

No registration is required. Doors will open 15 minutes prior to start time.

Books & Authors Newsletter

More events may be added for August 2017. To receive Books & Authors event reminders, consider signing up for our e-newsletter to get the latest on our festival lineup. Click here to sign up.

2017 Event Schedule

Download 2017 Festival Brochure

Thursday, July 13, 2017 | 5:00pm
The Outer Cape with Patrick Dacey
Reading & Signing

Robert and Irene Kelly were a golden couple of the late ‘70s—she an artist, he a businessman, each possessed by dynamism and vibrancy. But with two young boys to care for, Irene finds herself confined by the very things she’d dreamed of having. And Robert, pressured by Irene’s demands and haunted by the possibility of failure, risks the family business to pursue a fail-safe real estate opportunity.

Twenty years later, their now-grown sons, Nathan and Andrew, are drawn back to confront a fateful diagnosis. As they revisit the Cape Cod of their childhood, the ghosts of the past threaten to upend the tenuous peace of the present.

In The Outer Cape, Patrick Dacey delivers a story of four people grappling with the shadow of infinite possibility, a book in which chasing the American dream and struggling to survive are one and the same.


Saturday, July 15, 2017 | 11:00 am
Fiction Writer’s Panel with Ellen Herrick (The Forbidden Garden) & Anne LeClair (The Halo Effect), Kathy Aspden, (Baklava, Biscotti and an Irishman), & Holly Hodder Eger (Split Rock)
Reading & Signing

The Kirkland Hall estate in England is a vast property (a mini Downton Abbey) with one black mark upon its grounds. The Shakespeare garden is cursed, and any family member who tries to improve its bleak state is harmed in some way. The lord of the estate, Graham Kirkland, hears of Sorrel’s magic-touch gardening skills and lures her from her New England home to restore the garden. Since she is no relation to the family, he assumes she will not be affected by the curse. But -Graham’s brother-in-law, the broody Andrew, is thrown into the mix. He’s at a turning point in his life and is staying at Kirkland Hall to evaluate his future options. As Sorrel works wonders in the garden, the tender bud of a romance begins. As the curse is researched, secrets of the family’s past emerge.

In this tour de force, a father, shaken by tragedy, tries to avenge his daughter’s murder–and restore his family’s shattered life. It was supposed to be a typical October evening for renowned portrait artist Will Light. Over dinner of lamb tagine, his wife, Sophie, would share news about chorus rehearsals for the upcoming holiday concert, and their teenage daughter, Lucy, would chatter about French club and field hockey. Only Lucy never came home. Her body was found, days later, in the woods. With shocking events that reverberate for a lifetime, all are drawn closer to unraveling the mystery as their paths collide in a series of inextricably linked, dark, dangerous moments that could lead to their undoing…or to their redemption.

Artfully weaving together three lives, three coasts and three generations, Kathy Aspden’s breathtaking debut, Baklava, Biscotti, and an Irishman is a dazzling pastiche of love, deception, acceptance and forgiveness. When the choices that Teressa, Danny and Gregory make intersect with circumstances out of their control, they must straddle the fine line between what is right and what is unimaginable to live without – each asking What would I do for the sake of a child? It is a deeply moving story about the dynamics of love and loss, and what it takes to survive both.

After inheriting a house on Martha’s Vineyard and finding herself alone there with three young children, Annie Tucker must confront her past when an unresolved love tests whether she has the courage to resist the pull of seduction and reclaim her true self. Both poignant and funny, this story is about forgiveness, acceptance, and the power of love and family.


 

 

Monday, July 17, 2017 | 3:30pm
The Outer Beach: a thousand-mile walk on Cape Cod’s atlantic shore with Robert Finch
Interviewed by a special guest (to be announced)

Those who have encountered Cape Cod—or merely dipped into an account of its rich history—know that it is a singular place. Robert Finch writes of its beaches: “No other place I know sears the heart with such a constant juxtaposition of pleasure and pain, of beauty being born and destroyed in the same moment.” And nowhere within its borders is this truth more vivid and dramatic than along the forty miles of Atlantic coast—what Finch has always known as the Outer Beach. The essays here represent nearly fifty years and a cumulative thousand miles of walking along the storied edge of the Cape’s legendary arm.

Finch considers evidence of nature’s fury: shipwrecks, beached whales, towering natural edifices, ferocious seaside blizzards. Throughout these essays, Finch pays tribute to the Outer Beach’s impressive literary legacy, meditates on its often-tragic history, and explores the strange, mutable nature of time near the ocean. But lurking behind every experience and observation—both pivotal and quotidian—is the essential question that the beach beckons every one of its pilgrims to confront: How do we accept our brief existence here, caught between overwhelming beauty and merciless indifference?


Tuesday, July 18, 2017 | 6:30pm
In Conversation with B.A. Shapiro (The Muralist)
Interviewed by Mary Fran Buckley, Eight Cousins Bookstore

When Alizée Benoit, a young American painter working for the Works Progress Administration (WPA), vanishes in New York City in 1940, no one knows what happened to her. Not her Jewish family living in German-occupied France. Not her arts patron and political compatriot, Eleanor Roosevelt. Not her close-knit group of friends and fellow WPA painters, including Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Lee Krasner. And, some seventy years later, not her great-niece, Danielle Abrams, who, while working at Christie’s auction house, uncovers enigmatic paintings hidden behind works by those now famous Abstract Expressionist artists. Do they hold answers to the questions surrounding her missing aunt?


Thursday, July 20, 2017 | 3:30pm
Meet the Authors: Meaghan Brothers (Weird Girl and What’s His Name) and Cristina Moracho (A Good Idea)
Reading & Signing
Recommended for ages 14 +

In the podunk town of Hawthorne, North Carolina, seventeen-year-old geeks Lula and Rory share everything–sci-fi and fantasy fandom, Friday night binge-watching of old X-Files episodes, and that feeling that they don’t quite fit in. Lula knows she and Rory have no secrets from each other; after all, he came out to her years ago, and she’s shared with him her “sacred texts”–the acting books her mother left behind after she walked out of Lula’s life. But then Lula discovers that Rory–her Rory, who maybe she’s secretly had feelings for–has not only tried out for the Hawthorne football team without telling her, but has also been having an affair with his middle-aged divorcee boss. With their friendship disrupted, Lula begins to question her identity and her own sexual orientation, and she runs away in the middle of the night on a journey to find her mother, who she hopes will have all the answers.

Can the right kind of boy get away with killing the wrong kind of girl? Fin and Betty’s close friendship survived Fin’s ninth-grade move from their coastal Maine town to Manhattan. Calls, letters, and summer visits continued to bind them together, and in the fall of their senior year, they both applied to NYU, planning to reunite for good as roommates. Then Betty disappears. Her ex-boyfriend Calder admits to drowning her, but his confession is thrown out, and soon the entire town believes he was coerced and Betty has simply run away. Fin knows the truth, and she returns to Williston for one final summer, determined to get justice for her friend, even if it means putting her loved ones-and herself-at risk.


Saturday, July 22, 2017 | 6:00pm
Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich (The Fact of a Body: A Murder & A Memoir) in conversation with Leah Carroll (Down City: a Daughter’s Story of Love, Memory, and Murder )

Alexandria Marzano-Lesnevich begins a summer job at a law firm in Louisiana, working to help defend men accused of murder, she thinks her position is clear. The child of two lawyers, she is staunchly anti-death penalty. But the moment convicted murderer Ricky Langley’s face flashes on the screen as she reviews old tapes — the moment she hears him speak of his crimes — she is overcome with the feeling of wanting him to die. Shocked by her reaction, she digs deeper and deeper into the case. Despite their vastly different circumstances, something in his story is unsettlingly, uncannily familiar. Crime, even the darkest and most unsayable acts, can happen to any one of us. As Alexandria pores over the facts of the murder, she finds herself thrust into the complicated narrative of Ricky’s childhood.

Like James Ellroy’s, My Dark Places, Down City is a gripping narrative built of memory and reportage, and Leah Carroll’s portrait of Rhode Island is sure to take a place next Mary Karr’s portrayal of her childhood in East Texas and David Simon’s gritty Baltimore. Leah Carroll’s mother, a gifted amateur photographer, was murdered by two drug dealers with Mafia connections when Leah was four years old. Her father, a charming alcoholic who hurtled between depression and mania, was dead by the time she was eighteen. Why did her mother have to die? Why did the man who killed her receive such a light sentence? What darkness did Leah inherit from her parents? Leah was left to put together her own future and, now in her memoir, she explores the mystery of her parents’ lives, through interviews, photos, and police records.


Tuesday, July 25, 2017 | 6:30pm
Stealing Rembrandts: the untold stories of notorious art heists with Anthony Amore
Presentation by the author

Art theft is one of the most profitable criminal enterprises in the world, exceeding $6 billion dollars in losses to galleries and art collectors annually. In Stealing Rembrandts, authors Anthony M. Amore and Tom Mashberg reveal the actors behind the major art heists of the Dutch Master in the last century. Through thefts around the world–from Stockholm to Boston, Worcester to Ohio–the authors track daring entries into and escapes from the world’s most renowned museums, and robbers who coolly walk off with multimillion dollar paintings. Stealing Rembrandts is a dramatic and brilliant account that lets you peek into the alluring and little-known criminal art world.


 

Wednesday, July 26, 2017 | 6:30pm

In Conversation with Anita Diamant (The Boston Girl)
Interviewed by Mary Fran Buckley, Eight Cousins Bookstore

Anita Diamant is the author of twelve books.

Her first novel, New York Times bestseller, The Red Tent, has been published in more than 25 countries. Winner of the 2001 Booksense Book of the Year Award, it was adapted into a two-part miniseries by Lifetime TV.

Anita Diamant’s other bestselling novels include Good Harbor, The Last Days of Dogtown, Day after Night, and The Boston Girl.

Diamant has also written six non-fiction guides to contemporary Jewish life, the first of which, The New Jewish Wedding, has recently been revised and updated as The Jewish Wedding Now. Her other guidebooks include The Jewish Baby Book, Living a Jewish Life, Choosing a Jewish Life, How to Raise a Jewish Child and Saying Kaddish. A collection of her essays, Pitching My Tent, is drawn from twenty years worth of newspaper and magazine columns. An award-winning journalist, her articles have appeared in the Boston Globe Magazine, Real Simple, Parenting Magazine, Hadassah, Reform Judaism, Boston Magazine and Yankee Magazine.

Anita Diamant is the founding president of Mayyim Hayyim: Living Waters Community Mikveh, a 21st century reinvention of the ritual bath as a place for exploring ancient traditions and enriching contemporary Jewish life.

Anita Diamant grew up in Newark, New Jersey and Denver, Colorado. She graduated from Washington University in St. Louis with a degree in comparative literature and holds a Master’s degree in English from Binghamton University. She resides in the Boston area with her husband, Jim Ball.


Saturday, July 29, 2017 | 3:30pm

Cape Cod and the Islands: where beauty and history meet with Kathryn Kleekamp
Presentation by the author 

Cape Cod and its neighboring islands, Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard, possess extraordinary beauty. Magnificent ocean vistas, spectacular sand dunes, quiet marshes, and historic seaside villages bring people back year after year. Featuring more than 50 of Kathryn Kleekamp’s original oil paintings depicting land and seascapes along with rare historic photographs, this edition includes more than 20 new images and a chapter on current conservation efforts directed at preserving the area’s natural resources. Images and text capture the fundamental nature of this remarkable place: the heartbeat of those who farmed the land, fished the seas, captained the great schooners, or waited at home for a loved one’s return. For the inquiring visitor these remarkable stories of courage and enterprise provide background for thoughtful reflection. Traditional Cape and Island recipes are included as another link to the past.


Tuesday, August 1, 2017 | 6:00pm
Eden with Jeanne McWilliams Blasberg
Reading & Signing 

Becca Meister Fitzpatrick – wife, mother, grandmother, and pillar of the community – is the dutiful steward of her family’s iconic summer tradition. That is until she discovers her recently deceased husband squandered their nest egg. As she struggles to accept that this is likely her last season in Long Harbor, Becca is inspired by her granddaughter’s boldness in the face of impending single-motherhood and summons the courage to reveal a secret she was forced to bury long ago: She has a daughter she gave up fifty years ago. The question now is how her other daughter, Rachel with whom Becca has always had a strained relationship, will react. Eden is the account of the days leading up to the Fourth of July weekend, as Becca prepares to disclose her secret and her son and brothers conspire to put the estate on the market, interwoven with the century-old history of Becca’s family – her parents beginnings and ascent into affluence, and her mother’s own secret struggles in the grand home her father named Eden.

 


Tuesday, August 29, 2017 | 6:00pm
Sears Point: a novel of Cape Cod with Jim Coogan
Reading & Signing 

Set in Brewster on Cape Cod, the story features the life and challenges of Washington Foster Sears. Born in the early years of the 20th century, Washy Sears lives a century in the town of his birth and experiences the transition of his community from the traditional rural village life so well portrayed in the novels of Joseph Crosby Lincoln to the realities and demands of today’s world. Author Jim Coogan has created a series of interesting characters who share Washy’s life’s journey though such events as the days of Prohibition, the Great Depression, World War II and beyond into the post-war years where rapid growth changed not only the economy of Cape Cod, but also the political and social norms of the peninsula. More than just a history of a single town, Washy Sears’ life can be viewed as a mirror as to what happened not only to Brewster, but to all of Cape Cod over the last century.

 

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New Book Club for Intellectually and Developmentally Disabled Teens and Adults

Falmouth Public Library recently joined the Next Chapter Book Club Affiliate Network and will soon be launching a local club.  Founded by Dr. Thomas Fish, a professor at The Ohio State University in 2002, Next Chapter Book Club is a community-based book club program for individuals with Down Syndrome, autism, cerebral palsy and other types of intellectual and developmental disabilities. Next Chapter Book Club, which was awarded the “Innovations in Reading Prize” by the National Book Foundation in 2016, has clubs throughout North America and in other parts of the world.  Clubs meet in public places and are comprised of four to eight members and two volunteer facilitators who are trained to engage readers of all levels – including those who cannot read or are “emerging readers.”

“People with intellectual and developmental disabilities love books for the same reasons most people do. They enjoy being transported to different worlds where they meet interesting characters and learn about exciting new things.  Taking that journey with a group of friends makes it even more delightful and fun.”

– Susan Berg, Executive Director of the Ohio-based Next Chapter Book Club.

Although reading skills of Next Chapter Book Club members often improve as a result of reading more often, the program is more about “reading to learn,” rather than “learning to read.”  The primary focus is on having fun with friends in public place on a regular basis.

We currently are inviting new members and facilitators to join us on Monday afternoons from 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM starting on June 5, 2017. Free training for facilitators will be provided.

 Anyone interested in joining the club or becoming a volunteer facilitator should contact: Donna Burgess 508-457-2555 ext. 6 or email: dburgess@falmouthpubliclibrary.org

LGBTQAI Events in June

2017 Rainbow Reel Film Series

The Falmouth Public Library is proud to announce a selection of films celebrating LGBTQAI lives in June. Two of the films go back in time –  the life of real transgender pioneer Lili Wegener in 1920s Denmark (The Danish Girl) will be shown on Monday, June 26 and the six-time Oscar-nominated story of lesbian lovers in 1950s Manhattan (Carol) will be shown on Thursday, June 29. Join us for a third laugh-out-loud flick starring Robin Williams and Gene Hackman (The Birdcage) to start off the series on Friday, June 23 and on Wednesday, June 28, enjoy a breathtaking romance starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain).

Thank You for Coming Out

On Tuesday evening, June 27 at 7:00 pm, join us for our very first all ages storytelling event. We invite you to share your coming out story with us. The library is a safe space and a space where stories can grow and thrive. Read a diary entry, recite your own poem or of a poet’s you admire, sing a song, or just tell your story. Special guests include local writer, poet, and naturalist Elizabeth Bradfield.
Each presenter can sign up at the door beginning at 6:30 pm and will be given a five minute time slot to tell their story. Just bring yourself and a mic will be provided. Refreshments served. All ages welcome! All events are free and will be held in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room at the Main Library.

[Graphic by Mollie Roth]


Event Schedule

Friday, June 23, 2:30 pm: The Birdcage (1996): A young man whose father is gay and living with his lover above his father’s gay nightclub. The young man plans to marry a girl whose father is a Senator, old school, anti-gay and anti-Semitic. The girl’s parents decide to meet their future son-in-law’s “parents.” They are invited to dinner at the father’s “sanitized” digs. The father’s lover resent being hidden from view. He plots a disguise as a female.

Monday, June 26, 2:30 pm: The Danish Girl (2015): Gerda Wegener, a Danish artist, decides to use her husband Einar as her model for a painting of a young woman. Soon after, the popularity of the painting brings attention to the couple, and they decide to reveal the model “Lili” to the public by having Einar dress up as a woman. Yet, Einar soon discovers that he doesn’t mind being seen as a woman and finally admits to himself that he has always seen himself this way.

Tuesday, June 27, 6:30/7 – 8:00 pm: Thank You For Coming Out: Join us for a unique storytelling gathering and share your coming out story with us. Treats and refreshments will be served. All ages welcome. Sign up begins at 6:30 pm (15 slots available).

Wednesday, June 28, 2:30 pm: Brokeback Mountain (2005):Wyoming 1963, two young men are thrust together as ranch hands in the desolate landscape of the Rocky Mountains. This separation from modern amenities and people causes a bond to form between these two men, which at first neither is quite comfortable with.

Thursday, June 29, 2:30 pm: Carol (2015): New York in the 1950s is buzzing with the hottest styles and even hotter women. When a curious clerk at a department store meets a woman who’s both older and married, she snaps a picture when the beautiful lady isn’t looking. After this, her world is completely turned around. The two women are soon engulfed in a fiery romance that threatens to consume anything and everything that they’ve ever known.

 

Showing Soon

Hope you can join us for our Friday afternoon films in May and our Rainbow Reel Film Series in celebration of LGBT Pride Month this June! Free movies and free popcorn for all.

DateTimeMovie
Thursday, September 72:30pmThe Sense of an Ending (2017)
Thursday, September 142:30pmArrival (2016)
Thursday, September 212:30pmThe Martian (2015)
Thursday, September 282:30pmSilence (2016)
Thursday, October 192:30pmLive by Night (2016)
Thursday, October 262:30pmMy Cousin Rachel (2017)
Thursday, November 22:30pmThe Girl on the Train (2016)
Thursday, November 92:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 72:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 142:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 212:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 282:30pmTBA

Choose Privacy Week: May 1-7, 2017

Start learning how you can protect yourself this May during Choose Privacy Week at the library. Better Business Bureau and the Library Freedom Project will visit and present on various topics, including controlling your privacy online and protecting yourself against scams. Both programs are free and open to the public.

How can I learn about privacy?

 

 

Scams, Fraud, & Identity Theft

Thursday, May 4 | 4:00 pm | Hermann Meeting Room

Amy Schram from The Better Business Bureau’s Scams & Fraud program and Robin Putman from the MA Office of Consumer Affairs will cover the most common scams circulating the community, the major Red Flags to watch out for, and the precautionary steps we can take to protect ourselves from falling victim. A question and answer session will follow.

Protecting Your Privacy Online

This program has been canceled. It will be held in May 2018. 

Alison Macrina of the Library Freedom Project will be teaching the basics of keeping your online data as safe as possible. Learn about some of the threats to privacy that exist in the online sphere, as well as tips and tools that can help — password management, safer browsing, blocking web trackers, encrypted texting, and general strategies for safer online behavior. This is an increasingly important discussion in our modern, ever-evolving society.

Meet Our Speakers:

Amy Schram has been with Better Business Bureau since 2011 and is responsible for educating the public at large and fostering the business to consumer relationship. Prior to joining BBB Amy was traveling throughout New England serving as a Motivational Speaker for Monster’s Making It Count Programs. She has previously performed in the Entertainment Department of the Walt Disney World Company and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from Emerson College.

Robin Putman currently works for the MA Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation serving as it’s Research and Special Projects Manager. In her role within Consumer Affairs, Robin conducts extensive outreach in dozens of communities throughout the Commonwealth, planning, coordinating, scheduling, and participating in a wide variety of events to provide consumers with information, education, and resources.

Alison Macrina is a librarian, internet activist, the founder and director of the Library Freedom Project, and a core contributor to The Tor Project. Alison is passionate about connecting surveillance issues to larger global struggles for justice, demystifying privacy and security technologies for ordinary users, and resisting an internet controlled by a handful of intelligence agencies and giant multinational corporations.

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is a nonprofit organization focused on advancing marketplace trust, consisting of 112 independently incorporated local BBB organizations in the United States and Canada, coordinated under the Council of Better Business Bureaus (CBBB) in Arlington, Virginia.

The Library Freedom Project is a partnership among librarians, technologists, attorneys, and privacy advocates which aims to address the problems of surveillance by making real the promise of intellectual freedom in libraries. By teaching about surveillance threats, privacy rights and responsibilities, and digital tools to stop surveillance, the Project hopes to create a privacy-centric paradigm shift in libraries and the communities they serve.

Program Registration Form

    If your plans change, please contact us so we can make room for others. Please give us a call at (508) 457-2555 ext. 6 if you have any questions.
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Celebrate Poetry this Month

This April, we are celebrating the poet W.S. Merwin with three special programs. We hope you can join us!

merwinpoetry

Fri, April 7 | 1:00 pm | Trustees Meeting Room | Open to the public

Choose two poems by W.S. Merwin, make twelve copies, and join our poetry discussion group with Alice Kociemba this Friday, April 7.

Sat, April 8 | 2:00 pm | Hermann Meeting Room | Open to the public

Learn more about W.S. Merwin and join us for a screening of Even Though the Whole World is Burning this Saturday, April 8 at 2:00pm. Poet Elizabeth Bradfield will give a talk on Merwin’s poetry following the screening.

Sat, April 22 | 10:00 am – 1:00 pm | Hermann Meeting Room

Join Alice Kociemba for a writing workshop on nature poetry inspired by W.S. Merwin’s Garden Time on Saturday, April 22. Please register by emailing Alice: calliopepoetrycommunity at gmail.com

Facilitator:

Alice Kociemba is the author of the chapbook Death of Teaticket Hardware, the title poem of which won an International Merit Award from the Atlanta Review.  She is a member of Jamaica Pond Poets, a weekly collaborative workshop, and is the founding director of Calliope Poetry for Community. She facilitates a monthly Poetry Discussion Group at the library, an outgrowth of “Falmouth Reads Together,” the Favorite Poems Project.

Guest Speaker:

Elizabeth Bradfield is the author of Interpretive Work (Arktoi Books/Red Hen Press, 2008), which won the Audre Lorde Award and was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. Bradfield’s poetry has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, Poetry, Field, The Believer, Orion, and elsewhere. Anthologies such as This Assignment is So Gay: LGBTIQ Poets on Teaching, Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry, and others have included her work.

 

 

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Sign Up: April Vacation Week @ the Library

Tweens and teens are invited to register for activities during April’s vacation week at the Reference Desk or online using the form below. Registration has now started and we’re expecting activities to fill up quickly. We’re looking forward to having you!

Events will be canceled or rescheduled if less than 5 participants are confirmed for each activity *not including the movie on Tuesday, April 18. 

Modding Magic: Code with Minecraft  | Fri, April 14 @ 3:00-5:00pm | Grades 3 – 8 | Registration required

Calling all crafters! Thi Sarkis from the RI Computer Museum will offer this fun 2-hour workshop for grades 3-8 who are interested in gaming, minecraft, coding, and learning something new. Come learn how to summon lightning bolts with a bow and arrow or build giant rainbows in the minecraft world with code. Spawn-farm wild animals or monsters instantly and have fun “modding” your world. This workshop introduces coding concepts by showing kids & teens how to build or change the game using code based on the javascript programming language. All levels welcome and no experience is required.

Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) | Tues, April 18 @ 1:00pm | grades 5-12 | No registration required

In a time of conflict, a group of unlikely heroes band together on a mission to steal the plans to the Death Star, the Empire’s ultimate weapon of destruction. This key event in the Star Wars timeline brings together ordinary people who choose to do extraordinary things, and in doing so, become part of something greater than themselves.

Get Your Paint On | Wed, April 19 @ 2:00-4:00 pm | grades 5-12 | Registration required

Choose a landscape photo that you’ve taken and re-create it on canvas. Local artist, Jennifer Burkin, will teach you how to create beautiful landscapes using acrylic painting techniques during this fun workshop for all skill levels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Make a Mini-Comic with Marika | April 21 and 22 @ 2:00-3:30 pm | grades 5-12 | Registration required

Perhaps you’ve heard of her: Marika McCoola’s Baba Yaga’s Assistant was a 2016 Massachusetts Book Award Honor Book and on the New York Times bestseller list for 11 straight weeks. She’s a first-time visitor to Falmouth and will be teaching a two-day graphic novel workshop at the library. During this workshop, you’ll do group exercises each day and develop your very own, independent, multiple-page mini-comic.

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