Summer Reading on The Point

On today’s radio book show on The Point on WCAI we talked about great books for summer reading, if you have time for summer reading. If not, hold on to our suggestions until the autumn! Mindy Todd was joined by Jill Erickson, Head of Reference and Adult Services at the Falmouth Public Library and Jennifer Gaines, librarian at the Woods Hole Library. Thanks to all of our many callers, with all of your great book suggestions!

Our Books & Authors Festival will feature 16 authors over 8 weeks with 11 events! Authors include Robert Finch, Ellen Herrick, Patrick Dacey, Anne LeClair, and Anita Diamant! You can see all the details here! Geoff Wisner will be here on August 2nd, and you can read more about his visit and Thoreau’s 200th anniversary here.

Mindy’s Picks

Beyond the Bright Sea and Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk

 

Jennifer’s Picks

Summer World: a season of bounty by Bernd Heinrich

Population: 485, meeting your neighbors one siren at a time by Michael Perry

Coop: a year of poultry, pigs, and parenting by Michael Perry

Eels: an exploration, from New Zealand to the Sargasso, of the world’s most amazing and mysterious fish by James Prosek

The Boys in the Boat:nine Americans and their epic quest for gold at the 1936 Olympics  by D. J. Brown

House on Crooked Pond by M. L. Shafer

The Children of Green Knowe by L. M. Brown. The first in a series of six books.

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Nantucket Summer by Leila Howland. Contains Nantucket Red and Nantucket Blue in one volume.

Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson. Here’s more information on the Woods Hole Library Summer Book Club, Social Justice.

 

Jill’s Picks

Art of the National Parks by Jean Stern, Susan Hallsten McGarry, and Terry Lawson Dunn

The Outer Beach: a thousand-mile walk on Cape Cod’s Atlantic Shore by Robert Finch.

The Essex Serpent by Sarah Perry

“The Fall River Axe Murders” by Angela Carter in Saints and Strangers and in her Burning Your Boats: the collected short stories.

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt. Tinder Press edition now available.

Home Made Summer by Yvette Van Boven

Thoreau’s Wildflowers by Henry David Thoreau, edited by Geoff Wisner, with drawings by Barry Moser

Thoreau’s Animals by Henry David Thoreau, edited by Geoff Wisner, illustrated by Debby Cotter Kaspari

The Shark Club by Ann Kidd Taylor

Picture Books:

Duck’s Vacation by Gilad Soffer

Jabari Jumps by Gaia Cornwall (And this supplies the illustration for this blog!)

The Storm by Akiko Miyakoshi

Listener Picks

Y is for Yesterday by Sue Grafton. Put in your hold now! Due out August 22nd.

My Struggle. Book One. by Karl Ove Knausgaard

The Hate u Give by Angie Thomas

Ruthless River by Holly Conklin FitzGerald

Bless Me Mother: how church leaders fail women by Finbarr M. Corr

The News from the End of the World by Emily Jeanne Miller

Edgar & Lucy by Victor Lodato

The Rent Collector by Camron Wright

Monticello: a daughter and her father by Sally Gunning

The Nature of Cape Cod by Beth Schwarzman

Summer Reading Suggestions!

Hello Summer! As teachers and school staff wind down the school year, children’s departments in public libraries across the country are gearing up for summer reading! Here in the FPL Children’s Room, we’ve got lots of great upcoming events for our summer reading program entitled, “Build a Better World.” Some programs that I’m particularly looking forward to are the Summer Reading Kick Off Party, Saturday Cinema at the Library, and the Stuffed Animal Sleepover. See the FPL EventKeeper calendar for more events and info!

As a supplement to school summer reading lists, I’ve created a list of FPL Summer 2017 Recommended Reads. This is my third year creating such a list and at the risk of tooting my own horn, I have to say I think this is the best one yet. Not only is the design better (highly recommend canva.com for any readers who are looking for a good, free design program), but this year I’ve added pictures of the recommended books’ covers to make finding them easier. I am also intentional in including a diverse array of quality titles that serve as windows and mirrors for all readers! There is something for everyone here so stop by the FPL Children’s Room to find the book that’s right for you!

Stephanie Seales, Children’s Room

Friday Reads: A Rainbow of Recommendations

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

June is GLBT Book Month!

“The first and most enduring award for GLBT books is the Stonewall Book Awards, sponsored by the American Library Association’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Round Table.  Since Isabel Miller’s Patience and Sarah received the first award in 1971, many other books have been honored for exceptional merit relating to the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender experience.” (http://www.ala.org/glbtrt/award/stonewall).  The 2017 winners are:

(Clicking on the highlighted titles will bring you to the CLAMS catalog where you can read descriptions and place holds.)

Barbara Gittings Literature Award:  Desert Boys by Chris McCormick

Israel Fishman Nonfiction Award:  How to Survive a Plague:  the inside story of how citizens and science tamed AIDS by David France

Since 2010 the American Library Association has highlighted books published in the prior year that “reflect lesbian/gay/bisexual/transgender experience for adults,” with several annual book lists.  Their “Over the Rainbow” lists are for adults and encompass several subjects.  In case you missed them, see below.

2017 Over the Rainbow Top 10 Titles

The Firebrand and the First Lady:  portrait of a friendship:  Pauli Murray, Eleanor Roosevelt and the struggle for social justice by Patricia Bell-Scott (Nonfiction)

Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson (Fiction)

In the Darkroom by Susan Faludi (Nonfiction)

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera (Fiction)

Bettyville:  a memoir by George Hodgeman (Nonfiction)

A Body, Undone:  Living on After Great Pain by Christina Crosby (Nonfiction)

Stand by Me:  the forgotten history of the gay liberation by Jim Downs (Nonfiction)

Ask a Queer Chick:  a guide to sex, love, and life for girls who dig girls by Lindsay King-Miller (Nonfiction)

Boy, Erased: a memoir by Garrard Conley (Nonfiction)

The Imitation Game:  Alan Turing decoded by Jim Ottaviani (Nonfiction)

 

2017 Over the Rainbow Fiction/Literature Nominees

Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson (Fiction)

Beijing Comrades by Bei Tong

Call Me by My Other Name by Valerie Wetlaufer

The Cosmopolitans by Sarah Schulman

Dig by Brian Borland

God in Pink by Hasan Namir

Guapa by Saleem Haddad

If You Need Me I’ll Be Over There by Dave Madden

The Imitation Game:  Alan Turing decoded by Jim Ottaviani (Nonfiction)

Juliet Takes a Breath by Gabby Rivera

Moonstone:  the boy who never was by Sjón

Our Young Man by Edmund White

A Thin, Bright Line by Lucy Jane Bledsoe

 

 

Friday Reads: Writer’s Market 2017

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

Did you know that Falmouth is home to several published writers?  Peter Abrahams (a.k.a. Spencer Quinn), T. M. MurphyBill SargentBrent Runyon, Terri Arthur, Adelaide Cummings, Alice Kociemba and Molly Bang are a few you may be familiar with.   We also have a great many aspiring writers in town who join local writing clubs and workshops or slug it out with their computers at home.  I have met several who have used our library books, reference services, computers and printers to prepare their manuscripts and we are proud to be a part of the process.

Just this week a patron asked for information to help him get started with writing for publication, which brings me to my book of the week:  Writer’s Market 2017, 96th annual edition.  This authoritative guide has been around since 1921, providing “essential information and advice on the business and promotion of writing.”  It opens with several articles written by published authors that offer advice on finding and managing work, such as “Write Better Queries and Sell More Articles” and “How to develop an Effective Author Brand.”  The bulk of the guide comes next, a directory of markets, which lists:  literary agents, book publishers, consumer magazines and trade journals.  Also included in this section are a list of contests and awards.  The final sections are a list professional organizations, a glossary of terms (very helpful for newbies) and two indexes so you can find your way in a flash.

We have two copies of Writer’s Market: one that is always available in the reference room and another that can be checked out.  They both have the call # 070.52 WRI.

New writers looking to be published should also consult Literary Market Place:  LMP, 2017.  This “directory of the book publishing industry” is a two-volume set in the reference room only (call # 070.5 LIT) which lists publishers, editorial services & agents, associations, events, courses & awards, books & magazines for the trade, a personnel index and a company index.

Using both the Writer’s Market and LMP, aspiring writers are well armed to get their books published.

The Writer’s Market is part of a series.  Here are more titles from that series to help different types of creators get their work to the marketplace.  We update them annually.

Artist’s and Graphic Designer’s Market

Children’s Writer’s and Illustrator’s Market

Novel and Short Story Writer’s Market

Poet’s Market

Songwriter’s Market

As always, if you have questions or want to find more resources on writing and publishing, stop by the reference desk.  We’d love to help you.

Friday Reads: Voices in the Ocean

The Narrative Nonfiction Book Club has a theme for this six-month session called “Give Two Hoots.”  The first two months we read books about sea creatures.  For June and July we will read books about wars and in August and September, books about female computers.   So this week the discussion was all about the good, the bad and the ugly side of dolphins and their interactions with humans, based on what we learned from Voices in the Ocean, a journey into the wild and haunting world of dolphins by Susan Casey.

Casey, the New York Times best-selling author of The Devil’s Teeth (about sharks), and The Wave, describes the variety of ways that humans throughout history have regarded dolphins, from the Ancient peace – loving Minoans who revered them, to contemporary Japanese in the town of Taiji who hunt, slaughter and traffic them.  “In recent decades, we have learned that dolphins recognize themselves in reflections, count, grieve, adorn themselves, rescue one another (and humans), deduce, infer, seduce, form cliques, throw tantrums, and call themselves by name.”  “Yet there is a dark side to our relationship with dolphins. They are the stars of a global multi-million dollar captivity industry, whose money has fueled a sinister and lucrative trade in which dolphins are captured violently, then shipped and kept in brutal conditions.”   (Excerpted from the inner flap.)

Filled with facts that range from beautiful descriptions of their nature to disturbing accounts of inhumane treatment, Voices in the Ocean will inform, alarm and charm you.   You can find this book on our shelves with call number 599.53 CAS.

If you would like to join us on Thursday, June 6 to read Confederates in the Attic:  dispatches from the unfinished Civil War by Martha’s Vineyard author, Tony Horwitz, come to the reference desk to get a copy of the book or spoken CD.  We have one of each as I write this, but more will be coming in the next two weeks.  Hope to see you there!

International Labor Day Posters Exhibit

The Falmouth Public Library is one of three Cape libraries hosting an exhibit of international labor day posters which will give you a taste of May Day from around the world during the month of May.

May Day, the first of May is known throughout much of the world as the day for workers. It is celebrated in over one hundred countries by workers and trade unions. In most countries, the celebrations are not about military parades, but rather about highlighting the struggles workers are going through. It is not a recognized holiday in the US and Canada. Instead these two countries celebrate Labor Day. The reason for this is that the celebration of May Day was linked to Communism, Socialism, militant workers and other activists who fought for improving the lot of workers. The irony of this is that the movement of celebrating May Day as a workers holiday emanated from the US. A national strike was called for May 1, 1886, if Congress did not pass legislation shortening the work day to eight hours. On May 1, 60,000 workers went on strike in Chicago. The movement spread worldwide. The struggle for the 8-hour day was realized years later.

The exhibit is interesting as graphic art, and as culture and political history. Artists may appreciate the ways a similar theme is depicted in different countries and cultures. Lewis has made the foreign language posters more accessible by including information, including the translation of key phrases. Historians can see what social and political changes were being advocated for in different countries at different times. Activists can see some of their favorite causes, including the celebration of May Day itself in these posters. One example of interest Lewis points out is the difference between the tame language in the Liechtenstein posters, where workers are generally treated well, and the much more militant language in posters from countries like El Salvador, where labor unions are severely repressed.

Stephen Lewis is exhibiting May Day posters at the Falmouth, Mashpee and Bourne public libraries. Lewis has numerous May Day posters that he has collected, from France, Spain, Namibia, Australia, Denmark, Austria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Cuba, Germany and Liechtenstein to name only a few.

This project is supported in part by grants from the Falmouth and Mashpee Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, and by a number of labor unions including Roofers Local 33, Asbestos Workers Local 6, IBEW Local 103, Painters DC 35 and Laborer’s Local 1249 in memory of Norman P. Thayer.

Lewis has a collection of 6,400 posters which he exhibits regularly around Massachusetts. He can be reached by email: lewisposters@gmail.com

 

Tom Turkington’s Before I Forget: A Boyhood of Little Drama

It is always a pleasure to catalog the works of local authors, and Tom Turkington’s Before I Forget: A Boyhood of Little Drama is no exception.  Recently interviewed by Ken Gartner for The Enterprise, Mr. Turkington points out that his book is not simply about growing up in Falmouth; he does, after all, portray life in mid-20th century America, a time in history when families watched television together and  kids ran around freely and played throughout the neighborhood until the dinner bell rang.  Indeed, Before I Forget portrays a time when the pace of life seemed to pass so much slower—perhaps even for noted local runners such as Turkington and Gartner!

However, for those who are interested in local history, Turkington’s chronicles reference many of the unique characteristics of bygone Falmouth: the Fire Station whistle and the raft at Surf Drive Beach, to name just two.  In fact, for those who did grow up in Falmouth years ago, reading Before I Forget will certainly be a nostalgic walk down Memory Lane, as well as Scranton Avenue and Mill Road.  To be sure, whether remembering such teachers as Miss Mullen with her red hair and purple outfits on the Village School playground or reminiscing about Mr. Kalperis (also known as “Kalpy”) and the Lawrence High School track team; Turkington’s memoir not only depicts what it was like growing up during the fifties and sixties, but it also offers a rare glimpse into what it was like growing up in Falmouth, glimpses that may not be included in local history books and therefore often do run the risk of being forgotten.

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Popular Courses

Interested in learning how to use your iPad or iPhone to take pictures? Search for the iOS 10: iPhone and iPad Essential Training class and find the Shooting Photos and Video, and Managing Your Photo Library chapter.

Are you thinking about investing your money? Starting to weigh the risks and benefits? This class on Learning to Manage Personal Investments is a good first step before you get started.

If you have just signed up for your first gmail email address, this course will show you how to navigate your new inbox. Search for Gmail Essential Training.

If you need any help with these courses or finding other courses, just ask a librarian or visit the Reference Desk the next time you’re in the library. We’re always here to help.

Friday Reads: When Women Were Birds

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

A library staff member put a most unusual memoir on the staff picks shelf.  Author Pam Houston describes it as “much more than a brave and luminous memoir.”  Author Rick Bass calls it “a wise and beautiful and intelligent book.”  And author Sue Halpern calls it “gorgeous.”  When Women Were Birds:  fifty-four variations on voice by Terry Tempest Williams is all of those things, wrapped in a modest little white package.

When Williams’ mother was one week from death, she promised her daughter her journals, but stipulated that Williams could not read them until after she was gone.  When the time was right, Williams located the neatly arranged journals and was surprised to find blank pages.  All of them were blank.  Shelf after shelf of blank journals.  We get some semblance of the shock ourselves when we flip several blank pages in this book.  It is disconcerting.  Imagine being a woman for whom words hold such power, an author who writes beautifully and who loves her mother unconditionally … imagine her finding these blank journals.  In this memoir we follow along her emotional journey as she tries to fathom why her mother did this.  The result is a meditative, poignant and unique exploration for which there is no answer which is well worth the read.  Just don’t be in a hurry.

You can find this book on the staff picks shelf.

Friday Reads: Oysters: a celebration in the raw

Bacon-fatty, fruity, funky, mossy, velvety.   What do these words have in common?

They are a just a few selections from the lengthy oyster lexicon that aficionados use to describe this beloved bivalve.  If you’re still reading, then you must have at least a little interest in oysters, so I want to tell you about a little gem of a book in our new nonfiction area:  Oysters:  a celebration in the raw by Jeremy Sewall and Marion Lear Swaybill.   Scott Snider deserves a call out here for his top-notch photos that will make your mouth water while also providing scientific level detail.  No runway model has ever looked as good in a close-up.

This book, small and meaty like the mollusk it celebrates, has four sections that discuss the history and culture of oysters, the people who harvest them, a sumptuous photo gallery, and of course, oyster stories. You can probably guess some of the topics: aphrodisiacs, pearls, and that myth about the R month, but there are additional yarns to educate and entertain.  It is international in scope, but clearly focuses on Massachusetts farms.

You can find this book on the new nonfiction shelf with the call number 641.394 SEW.  If you’re going to check it out, plan on hitting an oyster bar soon after!