Books About Boats on WCAI

This morning was pledge drive at WCAI, so the book show was a little bit shorter than normal, but we had lots of calls! Thanks to all of you who called with your boat book suggestions! There was so little time and so many calls, that both Vicky and I are going to give you some bonus books in today’s book blog. If you missed the show, not to worry, you can listen online!

 

Mindy’s Pick

How I Became a Pirate written by Melinda Long, illustrated by David Shannon

 

Vicky’s Picks

Wooden Boats: In Pursuit of the Perfect Craft at an American Boatyard by Michael Ruhlman.   About the boatyard of Nat Benjamin and Ross Gannon on Martha’s Vineyard.

Herreshoff: American Masterpieces by Maynard Bray, Claus Van Der Linde and photos by Benjamin Mendlowitz

The Lazarus World Voyage: A Hurricane Wreck Circumnavigates the Globe by Tim Sperry.  5 young men, most from Marion, Mass. who sail around the world.

The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float by Farley Mowathilarious!

In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex by Nathaniel Philbrick

Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

Spartina by John Casey

Not enough time for:

Brilliant Beacons: A History of the American Lighthouse by Eric Jay Dolin

Crossing the Bar: The Adventures of a San Francisco Bay Bar Pilot by Captain Paul Lobo.  Captain Lobo lives part of the year in Falmouth.

Ninety Percent of Everything Inside Shipping, the Invisible Industry That Puts Clothes on Your Back, Gas in Your Car, and Food on Your Plate by Rose George

Two Coots in a Canoe: An Unusual Story of Friendship by David Morine

A Path in the Mighty Waters: Shipboard Life & Atlantic Crossings to the New World by Stephen R. Berry

First You Have to Row a Little Boat: Reflections on Life and Living by Richard Bode

Children’s Books

Heart of a Samurai by Margi Preus – based on the true story of Manjiro, a 14 year old Japanese boy who was shipwrecked in 1841 and picked up by an American whaling ship whose captain was from Fairhaven

A Storm Without Rain by Jan Adkins – 15 year old boy from Buzzards Bay goes back in time and meets his grandfather.

Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome – Classic! (I had this on my list too! Jill)

 

Jill’s Picks

Stuart Little by E. B. White (Particularly chapters VI, VII, and XIV.)

Schooner: building a wooden boat on Martha’s Vineyard by Tom Dunlop, photographs by Alison Shaw

Tinkerbelle by Robert Manry

Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog!) by Jerome K. Jerome

The Green Ray  by Jules Verne

Hemingway’s Boat: everything he loved in life, and lost, 1934-1961. (p. 56 mentions his trip to Cape Cod & Nantucket)

Food at Sea: shipboard cuisine from ancient to modern times by Simon Spalding

NOT ENOUGH TIME FOR

“The Sea and the Wind That Blows” essay by E.B. White in Essays of E.B. White. The first sentence: “Waking or sleeping, I dream of boats — usually of rather small boats under a slight press of sail.”

A Unit of Water, A Unit of Time: Joel White’s Last Boat by Douglas Whynott

Uncommon Carriers by John McPhee

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers by Henry David Thoreau

On the Water: Discovering America in a Rowboat by Nathaniel Stone

Images of America: Steamboats to Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket by William H. Ewen Jr.

Little Pig Saves the Ship by David Hyde Costello

 

LISTENER PICKS

Sailing Alone Around the World by Joshua Slocum

The Endurance: Shackleton’s legendary Antarctic expedition by Caroline Alexander

The Adventures of Onyx and the Fight Against the Falls by Tyler Benson

Patrick O’Brian Aubrey/Maturin series. Here is the order.

Captains Courageous by Rudyard Kipling

10,000 Leagues Over the Sea by William Albert Robinson

Voyages to Galapagos by William Albert Robinson

Horatio Hornblower novels by C.S. Forester. Dan Tritle tells us the character of Captain Kirk was based on the character of Hornblower!

 

 

Friday Reads: The New York Times – Large Print Weekly

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

BREAKING NEWS!

Falmouth Public Library now carries The New York Times Large Print Weekly.

If you have been frustrated with the tiny print of the daily New York Times, or given it up altogether, then you will be relieved to learn there is a large print edition in 16-point type for easier reading.

The large print weekly comes out on Mondays and contains a “full range of content from the past week’s Times.”  It includes world and national news, business, science and health, the arts, sports, and editorials.

You can find the large print weekly next to the regular print edition in our reading room.

Did you know, we also carry the large print edition of The Reader’s Digest and back issues can be checked out.

If you have any suggestions for other large print newspapers or magazines, let a reference librarian know.  We’d love to hear from you.

Friday Reads: Midnight Rising

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

This Friday Reads blog is written by retired reference librarian and member of the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club, Adrienne Latimer.

If you enjoyed reading Confederates in the Attic (featured in last Friday’s blog), then you must read another Tony Horwitz title: MIDNIGHT RISING: John Brown and the Raid That Sparked the Civil War!  It is a detailed account of how John Brown planned and carried out the 1859 attack on the Federal Arsenal in Harper’s Ferry, Virginia.  Many historians consider this event to be the spark that launched the Civil War.
Born in Connecticut, Brown came from a deeply religious family and grew up to abhor slavery.  As an adult he became an active Abolitionist.  He was not content simply to protest the continuing of slavery, he was determined to stop spread of slavery into the new territories and ultimately, to abolish slavery in the United States.  Southerners considered him a terrorist, but many Northerners revered him as a moral leader, a hero. Tony Horwitz provides that incredible event the added color of the backstory, with details gleaned from his research.  He has such a vivid, energetic writing style, he draws the reader into the story.  Never has history been so engrossing or exciting.

Friday Reads: Confederates in the Attic

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This month the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club discussed an old, but timely book.   Just a couple days after Independence Day, we got together on a sunny morning to examine Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches from the Unfinished Civil War by West Tisbury Pulitzer prize winning author, Tony Horwitz.

The timeliness was two-fold:  most obviously, we were discussing one of the most important events in the history of the United States during our country’s birthday week, with arguably the most significant battle of that war, the battle of Gettysburg, having taken place from July 1 to July 3, 1863.  Horwitz writes, “Probably no half hour in American history had been more closely scrutinized than Pickett’s Charge,” which was the culminating clash at Gettysburg on July 3rd.   It was also timely in view of our current political climate in which state capitals and old academic institutions are reconsidering the flags they wave and the reputations of the historic people in whose honor they have named buildings, while we grapple with our country’s racism.

The main theme in Confederates in the Attic, which was published in 1998, is that the civil war is still festering under the surface, that ancestors of Confederate soldiers and people of the south in general feel that their “way of life” is still under siege.  They still want to assert their states’ rights and not be dictated to by big government.  Reading this book helped explain to some of us northerners in the group, how southerners felt then and feel now about their “way of life,” the meaning of the Confederate flag and what they were fighting for.  It also helped explain our recent presidential election.

There was a lot to discuss with this book.  As I tried to break up the group at 5 past the hour, regretting aloud that I had to pull the plug, someone called out that we could go on talking for another hour, which was answered with a resounding, ‘yes!’  So, if you are looking for a good book for your book group, I can recommend this one.  It will surely get you talking.  You can find our copy on the staff picks shelf.

Join us next month when we will discuss Rise of the Rocket Girls:  the women who propelled us, from missiles to the moon to Mars by Nathalia Holt.   Pick up a copy of the book at the reference desk and come to the discussion on Thursday, August 3 at 10:00 AM in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room.  We look forward to another great discussion.

Friday Reads: Carved in Stone

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

During the course of a day’s work, combing through the stacks of books, I came across this beautiful catalog of early New England gravestones.  Carved in Stone by Thomas E. Gilson and William Gilson features high quality, close-up black and white photographs of over 80 gravestones with quotations by early New England writers and captions with practical information.  This book will be of interest to anyone who studies New England genealogy, early American art, history and those who seek solace in an old cemetery.  The inner flap states:  “These stones tell of death at sea, epidemics such as smallpox, the loss of children, and a grim view of the afterlife.  The graceful narrative explores a long personal involvement with the stones and their place in the New England landscape, and attempts to trace the curious and imperfectly documented history of the gravestone carvers.”

A list of plates in the back of the book indicates where the gravestones are located, (almost all are in Massachusetts, with many in Plymouth) and a short bibliography provides ideas for further reading.

You can find this book on the staff picks shelf.

@ the Library: Summer 2017

@ the Library: Things to Do

Summer is here and skies are blue, and we have a lot of free fun activities for teens and adults this July and August! Check out the Build a Better World program schedule for kids, too.

Kids!

Build a Better World: Programs for Kids!

Teens! (Grades 6-12)

Teen Summer Programs Brochure

View our Teen Brochure above to see the full list of programs we’re offering. Some activities are open to adults as well. Visit the Registration Page to register for our programs. If a program encourages advance registration, you may sign up one month in advance.

Wednesday, August 9: Escape Room: Escape the Wizard’s Tower [more information] Two sessions: 3:00pm or 6:00pm

Saturday, August 12, 3:00pm: iPhotography for Beginners [more information] Open to ages 12 to adult.

Tuesday, August 15, 6:00-7:30pm: Studio Art with Marika McCoola [more information]

Wednesday, August 16, 6:00-7:30pm: Mini-Figures with Marika McCoola [more information]

Thursday, August 17, 3:30-5:00pm: Mixed-Media Creations with Marika McCoola [more information]

Monday, August 21, 3:30-5:00pm: Art Cards with Green Art Workshop [more information] Open to ages 12 to adult.

Tuesday, August 22 – 25, 1:30-4:00pm: Get Your Act On: Theatre Camp [more information]

Movies and Popcorn

The Teen Movie Club is meeting this August. Join us for a PG-13 movie with free popcorn in the Hermann Meeting Room.

Friday, August 4, 2:30pm: Before I Fall [watch trailer] based on the bestselling novel by Lauren Oliver. Reserve the book.

Friday, August 18, 2:30pm: Everything, Everything [watch trailer] based on the bestselling novel by Nicola Yoon. Reserve the book.

Adults!

2017 Books & Authors Festival

Page to Screen Film Series: Thursdays at 2:30pm beginning on July 27

Visit the Registration Page to see a full list of our programs for adults.

iPhotography for Beginners with Lori Cooney [more information]

Art Cards with Green Art Workshop [more information]

 

Friday Reads: Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This year marks the 200th anniversary of the birth of noted Massachusetts author, Henry David Thoreau.  In honor of his birthday, several Massachusetts organizations have banded together to create the Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read, a celebration lasting throughout the whole year in which every Massachusetts town is encouraged to offer an event “that brings community member together to read and contemplate a work by Thoreau.  This is the first Statewide Read in the commonwealth that will focus on one author. The Thoreau Bicentennial Statewide Read is part of a global celebration that highlights the continued relevance of Thoreau’s writings and philosophical contributions, even 200 years after his birth (July 12, 1817). His ideas about the significance of nature, civil disobedience, the power of individual action and deliberate living have influenced millions over the past two centuries.”1

Inspired by Thoreau’s custom of taking long walks in nature minutely observing plants and animals, this week, the Falmouth Public Library and the 300 Committee co-hosted a 3.5 mile nature walk around Long Pond in Falmouth lead by a member of the 300 Committee.  It was followed by a reading of Thoreau on Freedom and refreshments at the main library.  Walkers, and non-walkers who came for the reading portion, all enjoyed the opportunity to take a metaphorical walk in this great man’s shoes on the lovely first day of summer.

The Long Pond walk was so appreciated that there are some murmurings about possibly organizing another one in the fall at another time of the week so more people can come.  Keep your eye on our website or sign up for our newsletter to keep abreast of our programming.

On August 2, we are delighted to present a second Thoreau event with author, editor, book reviewer and contributor to publications, Geoff Wisner of the Boston Athenæum.  Wisner, who edited two new books, Thoreau’s Wildflowers (2016) and Thoreau’s Animals (2017), will discuss Thoreau’s spirituality and man’s connection to nature, drawing from Thoreau’s journals and other writings.

Until that time, if you would like to familiarize yourself with Henry David Thoreau, check out this list of selected titles we have at our library:

The Annotated Walden or Life in the Woods Together with Civil Disobedience

Cape Cod

Collected Essays and Poems

Journal

The Maine Woods

A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers

A Thoreau Gazetteer by Robert F. Stowell (a geographical guide to the writings of Thoreau)

 

1 “Lincoln Library Hosts Statewide Reading Event to Reflect on Thoreau” by Whitney Retallic, director of education for the Walden Woods Project, posted on Wickedlocal.com Feb. 1, 2017 and viewed on June 22, 2017.

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Friends Book Sale

We’re happy to announce that the Friends of the Falmouth Public Library will be having their annual Book Sale this July between July 1-6! Most books are under $2 and you are sure to find something special for yourself or a loved one. The book sale will be held on the library lawn in front of the Main Library.

Book Sale Schedule

The sale starts on Saturday, July 1 and runs until Thursday, July 6, 2017.

Saturday, July 1: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Sunday, July 2: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Monday, July 3: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Tuesday, July 4: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Wednesday, July 5: 10:00 am – 4:00 pm
Thursday, July 6: 10:00 am – Noon

For more information about the Friends, visit their page.

Friday Reads: Daring Young Men

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Blogs may be about new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

On June 1st the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club discussed a book that was a little outside of our usual parameters.  Daring Young Men:  the heroism and triumph of The Berlin Airlift, June 1948 – May, 1949 by Richard Reeves, was light on the narrative and heavy on facts and figures, but it was fascinating reading.

Reeves, a lecturer, syndicated columnist and noted presidential biographer who “has received dozens of awards for his work in print, television and film” did extensive research from hitherto unpublished papers to recount in detail the Berlin Airlift. (From the author’s official website, richardreeeves.com) This amazing organizational feat supplied a city of over 2 million people with food and necessities for almost a year, all delivered by small airplanes.   Furthermore, this generous and daring mission was performed primarily by the U.S. Air Force and British Royal Air Force who had been bombing the city to smithereens only a couple years earlier.

Some readers struggled with the amount of figures, details and lists of supplies, etc.  The intended audience was a clearly a World War II history buff or strategic planner who revels in minutiae.  But for those of us who came to the discussion, which was a high number, especially in view of the rare glorious morning we had, we were happy to have read the book because we all felt that what we learned was important and interesting.  We gained respect for the magnitude of the undertaking, the humanitarian leadership coming from President Truman, and the bravery of the “daring young men.”

Next month we will discuss another war book, but it will be a different writing style altogether: jaunty, narrative and reflective.  Join us on Thursday, July 6 at 10 AM for Confederates in the Attic:  dispatches from the unfinished Civil War, by Martha’s Vineyard author, Tony Horwitz.   I predict it will be a great hour.

Books on the Point: Libraries & Librarians

 

 

 

 

 

Mindy Todd, host of WCAI’s The Point, and Jill Erickson, Head of Reference & Adult Services at the library, were on WCAI this morning with their book suggestions. The program was broadcast live at the WGBH Boston Public Library Studio. Andrew Maloney, Reader’s Services Librarian at the Boston Public Library, joined them for a great book discussion on libraries and librarians. Miss the show? You can listen online at capeandislands.org!

Thursday update:

Thanks for all the great comments about yesterday’s show! We loved this one so much, which was posted on the WCAI Facebook page by Jeanne Harper, that we’re going to add it here as well:

Great book ideas. Couldn’t catch the whole show so I have an addition you may not have talked about. Lirael (who becomes a librarian in a place where librarians sometimes need to wear swords depending on what section they are working in) by Garth Nix. It is the second in the Old Kingdom trilogy fantasy series (there are more than three now). Here is a quote: “Please,” said Lirael…”I think I would like to work in this Library.”
“The Library,” repeated Sanar, looking troubled. “That can be dangerous to a girl of fourteen. Or a woman of forty, for that matter.”
― Garth Nix, Lirael

We will definitely remember Sanar’s line!! I can’t wait to start reading, but I bet Andrew has already devoured these!

Andrew’s Picks

Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians by Brandon Sanderson

The Library of Babel by Jorge Luis Borges

People of the Book by Geraldine Brooks

The Rover by Mel Odom

The World’s Strongest Librarian: a memoir of Tourette’s, faith, strength, and the power of family by Josh Hanagarne

The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu: and their race to save the world’s most precious manuscripts by Joshua Hammer

 

Jill’s Picks

Houghton Library at 75: a celebration of its collections

This is What a Librarian Looks Like: a celebration of libraries, communities, and access to information by Kyle Cassidy

The Original Black Elite: Daniel Murray and the story of a forgotten era by Elizabeth Dowling TaylorT

The Giant’s House  by Elizabeth McCracken

You Could Look It Up: the reference shelf from ancient babylon to wikipedia by Jack Lynch

The Card Catalog: books, cards, and literary treasures by The Library of Congress; forward by Carla Hayden

The Goldbug Variations by Richard Powers

 

Listener’s Picks

Summer by Edith Wharton

The Lost Book of the Grail, or, a visitor’s guide to Barchester Cathedral by Charlie Lovett

Okay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt

Pretty Monsters: Stories by Kelly Link (specifically the story “Magic for Beginners”)

Do or Die by Jen McKinley