Welcome Dr. Budson!

As you age, you may find yourself worrying about your memory. Where did I put those car keys? What time was my appointment? What was her name again? With more than 41 million Americans over the age of 65 in the United States, the question becomes how much (or, perhaps, what type) of memory loss is to be expected as one gets older and what should trigger a visit to the doctor. Dr. Budson’s new book, co-written with Maureen K. O’Connor addresses these key concerns and more. Join us for a talk with Dr. Budson on Saturday, March 10, 2018, as he discusses his research and his new book, Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory: What’s Normal, What’s Not, and What to Do About it.

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Event Information:

Date: Saturday, March 10, 2018

Time: 1:30 -2:30 pm

Location: Falmouth Public Library, 300 Main Street, Hermann Meeting Room

No registration needed. Register on our registration page to receive a reminder email.

Andrew E. Budson, MD, majored in chemistry and philosophy at Haverford College before receiving his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. Dr. Budson is Professor of Neurology at Boston University, Lecturer in Neurology at Harvard Medical School, and Chief of Cognitive & Behavioral Neurology at the Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System. His career combines education, research, and clinical care to help those with memory disorders.

Maureen K. O’Connor, PsyD, was educated at Ithaca College, Indiana University of Pennsylvania, and Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. O’Connor is Assistant Professor of Neurology at Boston University, Director of Neuropsychology at the Bedford Veterans Affairs Hospital, and Member at Large of the National Academy of Neuropsychology. Her award-winning research, education, and clinical care focuses on patients with memory disorders.


“Memory concerns are common and addressing them in practical terms is rare. Andrew Budson and Maureen O’Connor take on this challenge in Seven Steps to Managing Your Memory, providing understandable real-world advice about how to know if memory is normal or abnormal and how to understand what memory impairment means. The advice is practical, comprehensible, and valuable – don’t forget this book.” — Jeffrey Cummings, MD, ScD, Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, Las Vegas, NV


“This book provides a comprehensive review of how the brain stores memories, the causes of memory disorders and how these disorders should be evaluated, treated and managed. This book is so clearly written that it provides valuable information and practical advice for people with memory disorders, their families and health-care professionals.” — Kenneth M. Heilman, MD, Department of Neurology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Gainesville, FL

“The book combines scientific data from the research literature, clinical knowledge, and their extensive experience to offer a helpful, practical guide to managing concerns that older people may have when their memories start to falter.” — Martin L. Albert, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA


“This thoughtful book offers insight into how the mind works and provides answers to fears about ‘losing our memory’. Through a series of vignettes, the authors help sort fact from fiction and, by the end of the book, the reader will be comforted to learn that being unable to find the keys for the tenth time in a week is likely the result of an overtaxed mind rather than something more serious. In this world of media bombardment and multitasking, here is a book that provides just the reassurance we need. A ‘must read’ for everyone over the age of 40. Just don’t forget to buy it!” — Cecilia McVey, RN, MHA, Certified in Nursing Administration, Boston, MA


“An informative and accessible discussion of memory loss, dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, and other mental-health concerns. This primer will be useful to middle-aged and elderly readers, caregivers, family members, healthcare professionals, and others striving to understand the aging brain or find concrete ways to enhance brain health.” – —Publishers Weekly


“Understanding how memory works, and how well it works, is key to understanding yourself. For this this reason, Seven Steps To Managing Your Memory is recommended reading for everyone.” — The Electric Review


“Overall, I would highly recommend the book as a valuable resource for patients and families. I found it to be clear, accessible, generally accurate reading. I will gladly recommend the book to my patients and their families, and I would encourage other neurologists to do the same.” — Cognitive and Behavioral Neurology

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