LGBTQAI Events in June

2017 Rainbow Reel Film Series

The Falmouth Public Library is proud to announce a selection of films celebrating LGBTQAI lives in June. Two of the films go back in time –  the life of real transgender pioneer Lili Wegener in 1920s Denmark (The Danish Girl) will be shown on Monday, June 26 and the six-time Oscar-nominated story of lesbian lovers in 1950s Manhattan (Carol) will be shown on Thursday, June 29. Join us for a third laugh-out-loud flick starring Robin Williams and Gene Hackman (The Birdcage) to start off the series on Friday, June 23 and on Wednesday, June 28, enjoy a breathtaking romance starring Heath Ledger and Jake Gyllenhaal (Brokeback Mountain).

Thank You for Coming Out

On Tuesday evening, June 27 at 7:00 pm, join us for our very first all ages storytelling event. We invite you to share your coming out story with us. The library is a safe space and a space where stories can grow and thrive. Read a diary entry, recite your own poem or of a poet’s you admire, sing a song, or just tell your story. Special guests include local writer, poet, and naturalist Elizabeth Bradfield.
Each presenter can sign up at the door beginning at 6:30 pm and will be given a five minute time slot to tell their story. Just bring yourself and a mic will be provided. Refreshments served. All ages welcome! All events are free and will be held in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room at the Main Library.

[Graphic by Mollie Roth]


Event Schedule

Friday, June 23, 2:30 pm: The Birdcage (1996): A young man whose father is gay and living with his lover above his father’s gay nightclub. The young man plans to marry a girl whose father is a Senator, old school, anti-gay and anti-Semitic. The girl’s parents decide to meet their future son-in-law’s “parents.” They are invited to dinner at the father’s “sanitized” digs. The father’s lover resent being hidden from view. He plots a disguise as a female.

Monday, June 26, 2:30 pm: The Danish Girl (2015): Gerda Wegener, a Danish artist, decides to use her husband Einar as her model for a painting of a young woman. Soon after, the popularity of the painting brings attention to the couple, and they decide to reveal the model “Lili” to the public by having Einar dress up as a woman. Yet, Einar soon discovers that he doesn’t mind being seen as a woman and finally admits to himself that he has always seen himself this way.

Tuesday, June 27, 6:30/7 – 8:00 pm: Thank You For Coming Out: Join us for a unique storytelling gathering and share your coming out story with us. Treats and refreshments will be served. All ages welcome. Sign up begins at 6:30 pm (15 slots available).

Wednesday, June 28, 2:30 pm: Brokeback Mountain (2005):Wyoming 1963, two young men are thrust together as ranch hands in the desolate landscape of the Rocky Mountains. This separation from modern amenities and people causes a bond to form between these two men, which at first neither is quite comfortable with.

Thursday, June 29, 2:30 pm: Carol (2015): New York in the 1950s is buzzing with the hottest styles and even hotter women. When a curious clerk at a department store meets a woman who’s both older and married, she snaps a picture when the beautiful lady isn’t looking. After this, her world is completely turned around. The two women are soon engulfed in a fiery romance that threatens to consume anything and everything that they’ve ever known.

 

Learn with Lynda.com

Anyone with a Falmouth Public Library card can log on and start learning from Lynda.com, a vast collection of online software training in 3D, animation, audio, business, design, developer, home computer, photography, video, web + interactive, Adobe, Microsoft, Apple, and more!

Get started here — all you need is your library card!

“lynda.com excels at helping busy professionals keep their software skills razor sharp.” —Jill Duffy, PCMag.com

“Amazing library of more than 3,000 online learning courses. Deep training for advanced software, particularly Adobe products. Well-structured site. Excellent video and audio quality. Well-vetted instructors.” — PCMag.com

Popular Courses

Interested in learning how to use your iPad or iPhone to take pictures? Search for the iOS 10: iPhone and iPad Essential Training class and find the Shooting Photos and Video, and Managing Your Photo Library chapter.

Are you thinking about investing your money? Starting to weigh the risks and benefits? This class on Learning to Manage Personal Investments is a good first step before you get started.

If you have just signed up for your first gmail email address, this course will show you how to navigate your new inbox. Search for Gmail Essential Training.

If you need any help with these courses or finding other courses, just ask a librarian or visit the Reference Desk the next time you’re in the library. We’re always here to help.

Showing Soon

Hope you can join us for our Friday afternoon films in May and our Rainbow Reel Film Series in celebration of LGBT Pride Month this June! Free movies and free popcorn for all.

DateTimeMovie
Thursday, September 72:30pmThe Sense of an Ending (2017)
Thursday, September 142:30pmArrival (2016)
Thursday, September 212:30pmThe Martian (2015)
Thursday, September 282:30pmSilence (2016)
Thursday, October 192:30pmLive by Night (2016)
Thursday, October 262:30pmMy Cousin Rachel (2017)
Thursday, November 22:30pmThe Girl on the Train (2016)
Thursday, November 92:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 72:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 142:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 212:30pmTBA
Thursday, December 282:30pmTBA

Celebrate Poetry this Month

This April, we are celebrating the poet W.S. Merwin with three special programs. We hope you can join us!

merwinpoetry

Fri, April 7 | 1:00 pm | Trustees Meeting Room | Open to the public

Choose two poems by W.S. Merwin, make twelve copies, and join our poetry discussion group with Alice Kociemba this Friday, April 7.

Sat, April 8 | 2:00 pm | Hermann Meeting Room | Open to the public

Learn more about W.S. Merwin and join us for a screening of Even Though the Whole World is Burning this Saturday, April 8 at 2:00pm. Poet Elizabeth Bradfield will give a talk on Merwin’s poetry following the screening.

Sat, April 22 | 10:00 am – 1:00 pm | Hermann Meeting Room

Join Alice Kociemba for a writing workshop on nature poetry inspired by W.S. Merwin’s Garden Time on Saturday, April 22. Please register by emailing Alice: calliopepoetrycommunity at gmail.com

Facilitator:

Alice Kociemba is the author of the chapbook Death of Teaticket Hardware, the title poem of which won an International Merit Award from the Atlanta Review.  She is a member of Jamaica Pond Poets, a weekly collaborative workshop, and is the founding director of Calliope Poetry for Community. She facilitates a monthly Poetry Discussion Group at the library, an outgrowth of “Falmouth Reads Together,” the Favorite Poems Project.

Guest Speaker:

Elizabeth Bradfield is the author of Interpretive Work (Arktoi Books/Red Hen Press, 2008), which won the Audre Lorde Award and was a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award. Bradfield’s poetry has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic Monthly, Poetry, Field, The Believer, Orion, and elsewhere. Anthologies such as This Assignment is So Gay: LGBTIQ Poets on Teaching, Open the Door: How to Excite Young People About Poetry, and others have included her work.

 

 

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Acrylic Landscapes with Jennifer Burkin

The workshop is now over. Thanks for coming!

Join us for a special workshop for adults with local artist, Jennifer Burkin. Create a gorgeous acrylic landscape on canvas. Beginners welcome. Please sign up using the form below or give us a call at the Reference Desk. We expect this event to fill quickly.

We also have a class available for teens in grades 6-12. Please register a teen for Get Your Paint On with Jennifer here. 


Jennifer Burkin is both an artist and art educator. Jennifer has a Master’s degree in elementary art education from Tufts University in affiliation with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Additionally she has a Graduate Certificate from Harvard University in Museum Studies. She grew up in Brookline, MA and now lives on Martha’s Vineyard where she continues to make art, sell her artwork, and teach art.

Jennifer paints with acrylics and adds in handmade papers, found objects, etc, turning many paintings into mixed media pieces. Her subjects are largely domestic, many pieces are in fact of her own dog. Other images of domesticity are kitchen utensils and children’s and women’s clothing. She frequently paints and collages images of birds as well.


More Information:

Date: Wednesday, April 19

Time: 5:00-7:00pm

Room: Bay Meeting Room

Program Registration Form

  • We will only call you if the program(s) you signed up for are canceled.
  • If you choose to provide an email address, we will send you an email reminder.
    If your plans change, please contact us so we can make room for others. Please give us a call at (508) 457-2555 ext. 7 if you have any questions.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

New Books are Blooming

Springtime is here and these new books are blooming with hilarious and human tales about life. What do you get when Elvis, Lucy, Vance, Nelson and Nadia share their stories? Books to add to your ‘must read’ list.

1. Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

Twelve-year-old Elvis Babbitt has a head for the facts: she knows science proves yellow is the happiest color, she knows a healthy male giraffe weighs about 3,000 pounds, and she knows that the naked mole rat is the longest living rodent. She knows she should plan to grieve her mother, who has recently drowned while sleepwalking, for exactly eighteen months. But there are things Elvis doesn’t yet know–like how to keep her sister Lizzie from poisoning herself while sleep-eating or why her father has started wearing her mother’s silk bathrobe around the house. Elvis investigates the strange circumstances of her mother’s death and finds comfort, if not answers, in the people (and animals) of Freedom, Alabama. As hilarious a storyteller as she is heartbreakingly honest, Elvis is a truly original voice in this exploration of grief, family, and the endurance of humor after loss.

Reserve

2. The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn

A hilarious and emotionally charged novel about a couple who embark on an open marriage-what could possibly go wrong?

 

 

Reserve

3. News From the End of the World by Emily Jeanne Miller

“A novel about the lovable but dysfunctional Lake family of Cape Cod and the four fraught days that will make or break them…Vance Lake is broke, jobless, and recently dumped. He takes refuge at his twin brother Craig’s house on Cape Cod and unwittingly finds himself smack in the middle of a crisis that would test the bonds of even the most cohesive family, let alone the Lakes. Craig seethes, angry and mournful at equal turns. His exasperated wife, Gina, is on the brink of an affair. At the center of it all is seventeen-year-old Amanda: adored niece who can do no wrong to Vance, surly stepdaughter to Gina, and stubborn, rebellious daughter to Craig. She’s also pregnant. Told in alternating points of view by each member of this colorful New England clan and infused with the quiet charm of the Cape in the off-season, The News from the End of the World follows one family into a crucible of pent-up resentments, old and new secrets, and memories long buried. Only by coming to terms with their pasts, both as individuals and together, do they stand a chance of emerging intact”– Provided by publisher.

Reserve

4. Hearts of Men by Nickolas Butler


An epic novel of intertwining friendships and families set in the Northwoods of Wisconsin at a beloved Boy Scout summer camp–from the bestselling author of Shotgun Lovesongs

 

Reserve

5. Exit West by Mohsin Hamid

“From the internationally bestselling author of The Reluctant Fundamentalist and How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia, a love story that unfolds in a world being irrevocably transformed by migration. In a country teetering on the brink of civil war, twoyoung people meet–sensual, fiercely independent Nadia and gentle, restrained Saeed. They embark on a furtive love affair, thrust into premature intimacy by the unrest roiling their city. When it explodes, turning familiar streets into a patchwork of checkpoints and bomb blasts, they begin to hear whispers about doors–doors that can whisk people far away, if perilously and for a price. As violence and the threat of violence escalate, Nadia and Saeed decide that they no longer have a choice. Leaving their homeland and their old lives behind, they find a door and step through. Exit West is an epic compressed into a slender page-turner–both completely of our time and for all time, Mohsin Hamid’s most ambitious and electrifying novel yet”– Provided by publisher.

Reserve

Demystifying College Admissions

Please join us for a special presentation for college-bound teens and their families with Terry Greene Clark, author of Demystifying College Admissions.

Join Terry for an inside look at the college admissions process. Learn about the college application, the redesigned SAT, college athletics, financial aid and more! Terry will share some of her own experiences – having sent three of her four children off to college in the last six years.

Copies of Terry’s book will be available for sale at the time of the event. You can also request the book via our library catalog.

Registration is strongly encouraged as seats are limited.

More Information:

Date: Saturday, April 8, 2017

Time: 10:00 – 11:30 am

Room: Bay Meeting Room

Black Literature Matters

On Saturday, March 4,  Sara Hines (co-owner of Eight Cousins) and I hosted “Black Literature Matters: A Book Talk”. The event was a huge success and our thanks go out to everyone who braved the cold to hear about these important titles. As a part of a larger series entitled, “Books Build Conversations,” we focused on #ownvoices books. #OwnVoices is a hashtag coined in 2015 in order to highlight stories written by authors from marginalized communities featuring protagonists who are also a part of those same communities. For our purposes, we chose books by black authors with black protagonists.

A few days ago, the Cooperative Children’s Book Center released a graph on their blog chronicling the rise and fall of children’s books with black protagonists both by non-black authors and #ownvoices authors.

This graph would have been perfect to include in our talk. As the author of the blog points out, authenticity matters: books about black characters written by non-black authors, while well-intentioned, may fall into the problematic tropes and reinforce stereotypes and negative ideologies. Also, as the author of the blog states, black authors and illustrators need to be “given the same opportunities to tell their own stories”.

In order to give attendees the opportunity to really connect with each title, Sara and I limited our scope by each selecting one book from four categories: picture book, middle grade, teen/young adult, and non-fiction. We committed to reading each other’s selections to ensure an in-depth conversation. During the talk, we shared background on the #ownvoices hashtag, the need for diverse representation in children’s literature, and described how books serve as windows or mirrors depending on the reader. In addition, we dialogued about each of our eight selections, discussing the stories and our thoughts about them.

Each attendee was given a pamphlet that included all of the books highlighted during the talk, as well as additional recommended #ownvoices titles. You can view and print the pamphlet below and if you click on the booklist link, you will find a list with additional titles that feature black protagonist by authors/illustrators that may or may not be #ownvoices. All books are available within the CLAMS system. Both the pamphlet and the list are free and may be reproduced. If you have any questions, please feel free to email Sara (sara@eightcousins.com) or I (sseales@falmouthpubliclibrary.org) directly.

–Stephanie Seales
Falmouth Public Library Children’s Room

Click here to view the handout

Click here for the booklist

 

Mindful Movement with Deborah Kinghorn

*This program has been postponed by the presenter. It has been rescheduled for Friday, May 5. If you had already signed up for the original March 31 date, you do not need to sign up again. We look forward to having you!*

How do people of a certain age, their bodies stiff and creaky, suddenly feel a spring in their step and an urge to dance when they hear the music of their youth? Join Deborah Kinghorn, a professor of theater and dance at the University of New Hampshire, as she explains how the answer can be found in the body’s natural energy sources.

We would love to have you for our interactive class. Please sign up below or give us a call at the Reference Desk.


Deborah Kinghorn is a Master Teacher of Lessac Kinesensic Voice and Body Training and currently serves on the Master Teacher Council of the Lessac Training and Research Institute, where she regularly teaches and conducts research at the Lessac Summer Intensive Workshop. She received the University of Houston Teaching Excellence Award in 1995, the Lessac Institute Leadership Award in 2009, the UNH Teaching Excellence Award for 2011-12, and in 2013 was a Fulbright Scholar in the Acting, Media and Culture Post-Masters Program at the University of Rijeka in Croatia.


More Information:

Date: Friday, May 5

Time: 2:30-4:00pm

Room: Hermann Meeting Room

Program Registration Form

  • We will only call you if the program(s) you signed up for are canceled.
  • If you choose to provide an email address, we will send you an email reminder.
    If your plans change, please contact us so we can make room for others. Please give us a call at (508) 457-2555 ext. 7 if you have any questions.
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

Friday Reads: The Encyclopedia of Journalism

Are you aghast at the prevalence of fake news swirling around? How is one to distinguish it from the real thing? Just in time, the library offered an  enlightening presentation by news professionals on how to spot fake news, and a blog that offered resources to help. One of these resources is The Encyclopedia of Journalism (REF 070.4 ENC 2009). Here you’ll find reliable, credible information, written by academics, to fill in some of the blanks you may encounter in reading the news. Need some background on what exactly is Al Jazeera? Maybe you’re wondering what the relationship is between the Supreme Court and the press? You’ll find it here.

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With all the misinformation swirling around, what is happening to our society all of a sudden? If you think today’s fake news is a new phenomenon, open volume 4 of the encyclopedia to the News Scandals section (page 1273) and discover prominent journalists of the past who plagiarized, fabricated, and otherwise misled their readers in well-known publications. Some even won Pulitzer Prizes before their fake news was discovered. It doesn’t sound all that different from today, except fake news lately seems to be seeping from every imaginable direction.

In the end it’s all about ethics. The press has a tradition of self-regulation. Yet there often is friction surrounding things like what is the truth and the right to know versus privacy issues. Volume 5 presents some key documents that reflect the ongoing struggle between journalists and the public and the courts to define where journalists’ professional rights end and legal restrictions begin.

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