Books of Ireland for a Green Spring Day

Today’s The Point with Mindy Todd on WCAI featured books about Ireland and by Irish authors. We think all of today’s Spring green was a perfect setting for Irish books. Joining Jill Erickson, Head of Reference & Adult Services, was Vicki Titcomb of Titcomb’s Bookshop in East Sandwich. What a pleasure it was to have Vicki back in the studio with us! And if you missed the show this morning, you can listen online.

I did have a few updates on past shows this morning. Thanks again to the anonymous donor who brought me six paperback copies of Josephine Tey mysteries, after I mentioned I had not read them, last February when we did the mystery book show with Jennifer Gaines of the Woods Hole Library. I have now begun to read Josephine Tey, and very much enjoyed reading Miss Pym Disposes.

Last month, when we were talking about bird books, I had mentioned a novel that I had not yet read nor even seen, but had learned about via Twitter! It was published in Australia, and thus was a bit tricky to find a copy. However, I now have read The Birdman’s Wife by Melissa Ashley, a very beautiful and moving novel about Elizabeth Gould, wife of ornithologist John Gould. Thanks to the Biodiversity Heritage Library you can see many of her bird paintings on Flickr! The novel is also chock full of details about painting and science, childbirth, and most especially the collecting of birds to identify new species. It also is a particularly beautiful book, with fabulous endpapers and jacket and even the paper is lovely, all thanks to Affirm Press, as they say on their web page: “an independent Melbourne-based publisher dedicated to publishing great Australian stories, big ideas, and the most engaging local and international authors.” The novel is now available at the Falmouth Public Library, and I hope soon will be picked up by an American publisher! If you want your very own copy, you currently can purchase a copy via Book Depository. As they describe themselves on their web page: Book Depository is “the world’s leading specialist online bookstore. We’re proud to offer over 17 million titles, all at unbeatable prices with free delivery worldwide to over 100 countries.”

So here are the lists, and now I have to go do my reference librarian homework, and see if Frank Zappa really was the first to say: “So many books, so little time.”

Vicki’s Picks

Opened Ground Selected Poems, 1966-1966 by Seamus Heaney “Digging”
Collected Stories by Frank O’Connor
Galway Bay by Mary Pat Kelly
In the Woods by Tana French
The Green Road by Anne Enright
Circle of Friends by Maeve Binchy
The Princes of Ireland: the Dublin Saga by Edward Rutherford
Saints for All Occasions by J. Courtney Sullivan
Eggshells by Caitriona Lally
An Irish Doctor in Love and at Sea by Patrick Taylor

Didn’t cover, but really wanted to:

The Immortal Irishman: the Irish Revolutionary who Became an American Hero by Timothy Egan

Jill’s Picks

A Journey with Two Maps: becoming a woman poet by Eavan Boland
The Search for Missing Friends: Irish immigrant advertisements placed in the Boston Pilot
Saints and Sinners by Edna O’Brien (or any collection of Edna O’Brien stories)
The Springs of Affection: stories of Dublin by Maeve Brennan (or any collection of Maeve Brennan stories)
An Irish Country Doctor by Patrick Taylor
Walking in Ireland: 50 walks through the heart and soul of Ireland by Christopher Somerville
Irish Travellers: the unsettled life by Sharon Bohn Gmelch & George Gmelch

Listener Picks

A Shocking Assassination by Cora Harrison
The Trick of the Ga Bolga by Patrick McGinley

Bird Books on The Point

Today was the monthly  WCAI book show with Mindy Todd on The Point. We hope you got to hear Dennis Minsky  and Jill Erickson talk about bird books. We had such big piles of bird books, we think we’ll be doing another bird book show in the fall! Sorry we were pre-recorded today, so you couldn’t call in with your favorites, but if you have a favorite bird book, please add a comment to our list! Miss the show? You can listen here!

 

Dennis’s Picks

Ode to a Nightingale” by John Keats

The Kookaburas” and “White Owl Flies Into and Out of the Field” from House of Light by Mary Oliver

Mind of the Raven by Bernd Heinrich

The Genius of Birds by Jennifer Ackerman

Birdscapes: birds in our imagination and experience by Jeremy Mynott

Wesley the Owl: the remarkable love story of an owl and his girl by Stacey O’Brien

The Peregrine by J. A. Baker

The Running Sky by Tim Dee

 

Jill’s Picks

The Eponym Dictionary of Birds by Bo Beolens, Michael Watkins, and Michael Grayson

Bright Wings: an illustrated anthology of poems about birds edited by Billy Collins with paintings by David Allen Sibley (Includes Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird by Wallace Stevens

The Birdman’s Wife by Melissa Ashley. Nominated for the Australian Book Industry Award for Fiction.

John Gould’s Birds, with a biographical introduction by Maureen Lambourne

A Convergence of Birds, edited & introduced by Joanthan Safran Foer

Joseph Cornell’s Manual of Marvels: how Joseph Cornell reinvented a French agricultural manual to create an American masterpiece

Mr. Cornell’s Dream Boxes by Jeanette Winter

Birds Art Life: a year of observation by Kyo Maclear

A Year of Falmouth Birds by Craig Gibson, photographer

 

 

 

Resources for Verifying News

Last night, we had a great discussion about fake news, media literacy, and the role of the public library to help people find reliable sources. Big thanks to Sean Corcoran and Allison Butler for leading the discussion, and to FCTV for streaming the program live to Channel 13. I also would like to thank the audience for all of their participation and thoughtful comments and questions.  I hope everyone learned a little bit more about how to identify reliable news sources.  At the bottom of this blog, you will see a list of online news resources and ways to improve your media literacy.

I began the evening with a few quotations:

“The highest purpose of the library is to serve as the armory of the truth, to defend it against lies that serve the powerful.” John Overholt, Curator of Early Modern Books and Manuscripts, Houghton Library, Harvard University.

“Google can bring you back 100,000 answers. A librarian can bring you back the right one.” Neil Gaiman

“When Oxford Dictionaries announce post-truth is Word of the Year 2016, we as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking — a crucial skill when navigating the information society.” IFLA, the International Federation of Library Associations

“Standing up for our values also means, as we all surely know, that we must be especially careful to provide the highest level and quality of service to people and communities who see the world differently, and who maybe aren’t unhappy about the new direction of the country.

Indeed, the American Library Association Code of Ethics states: ‘We distinguish between our personal convictions and professional duties and do not allow our personal beliefs to interfere with fair representation of the aims of our institutions or the provision of access to their information resources.” That’s not always easy or comfortable, it’s just crucial because it’s everyone’s library. We absolutely cannot afford to start eroding confidence in who we are and what we do.” Joseph Janes, Library Journal, March/April 2017

And for those of you interested in the erroneous Moby-Dick quotation about cranberries that I mentioned last night, you can read my blog on this here. And as a bonus, my blog on an erroneous Scott F. Fitzgerald quotation! (And do read the comments at the bottom of that blog entry! We even were mentioned on a blog created in New Zealand!)

All of the resources below will help you with your media literacy skills and give you a hand identifying true news from untrue news. And remember, you can always ask a reference librarian for more help!


Center for News Literacy: Stony Brook University School of Journalism. It is designed to help students develop critical thinking skills in order to judge the reliability and credibility of information, whether it comes via print, television or the Internet.

Factcheck.org: A Project of the Annenberg Public Policy Center

Fighting Fake News, and article by Marcus Banks from American Libraries Magazine

How to Spot Fake News from IFLA (International Federation of Library Associations)

Indiana University East Campus Library: How to identify and avoid fake news

Mass Media Literacy: Their mission is to ensure that all Massachusetts students are taught the critical thinking skills needed to engage with media as active and informed participants in the 21st century.

Massachusetts Library System Fake News Resources

The News Literacy Project: a nonpartisan national education nonprofit that works with educators and journalists to teach middle school and high school students how to sort fact from fiction in the digital age.

Snopes: a small staff of researchers and writers dedicated to investigating and analyzing rumors.

Storytellers Without Borders, a partnership between The Dallas Morning News and the Dallas Public Library

The Trust Project at Santa Clara University

You might also be interested in this six volume set of books in the Reference Room: Encyclopedia of Journalism, General Editor, Christopher H. Sterling. Of particular interest, the section on “Self-Regulation” which includes a history of news scandals.

 

Notice from Lynda.com

Lynda.com users impacted by data breach in December 2016

The Lynda.com security team determined that an unauthorized third party breached a database that included information about our Lynda.com users. Certain user information, like learning history, was exposed. Any users who had email addresses or passwords exposed were notified directly by Lynda.com in December 2016. For the small percentage of users who had cryptographically salted and hashed passwords exposed, Lynda.com invalidated their passwords and required that they create new ones. There is no evidence that any of this data has been made publicly available.

If you have questions, we encourage you to contact Lynda.com through their Support Center.

Mysteries on The Point!

Today on The Point we talked about mysteries! If you missed the show, you can listen online. By the way, the great photo that WCAI used to illustrate the radio show was taken from the back cover of Killer Verse: poems of murder and mayhem. Jennifer Gaines of the Woods Hole Library (and enthusiastic mystery reader) joined Mindy Todd and Jill Erickson for a lively discussion on what a mystery is and why one kind of mystery appeals to one person and not another, not to mention the plight of a library cataloger trying to decide where to SHELVE a novel that might be a mystery and might not.

Jennifer asked if we could post our mystery lists, and they are now posted! The lists include Stand-Alone Mysteries, Mystery Series Set in Foreign Cultures, and Mysteries Set in the United States.

I mentioned the Twitter conversation with Neil Gaiman‘s twitter followers, which began here, and then continued over here. And thus began a cataloging conversation for the ages between an international world of public and academic librarians, and just readers who love Neil Gaiman. As Susan Wyndham commented: “Great question, great discussion. Can we have librarians unleash Dewey knowledge every week? Are there other tricky books?” To which Mr. Gaiman wrote: “probably another question for the librarians.” The conversation itself surrounded Gaiman’s newest book Norse Mythologyand you will see in the link that we have decided to put one copy in fiction and one copy in non-fiction.

But I digress! The real discussion was about how deeply librarians care about where to put mysteries, and thus what IS a mystery, and also some great books about mysteries. The list of books discussed are below. We hope you enjoyed the show! We did!

 

Jennifer’s Picks

MYSTERIES, American in which winter weather figures heavily:

William Kent  Krueger:  character Cork O’Connor in Minnesota;

Julia Spencer-Fleming:    “novels of faith, murder, and suspense” Characters Rev’d Clare Ferguson & police Chief  Russ Van Alstyne, upstate New York, town in the farm and factory land nestled against the Adirondacks, In the Bleak Mid-Winter, etc.

MYSTERIES, Canadian:

Louise Penny: province of Quebec, village of Three Pines

MYSTERIES/Thrillers, Scandinavian Noir

(Sweden) Hennig Mankell, Kurt Wallender series; Steig Larsson, Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, etc.

(Norway) Jo NesboKarin Fossum

(Iceland) Arnaldur Indridason

(Denmark) Peter Høeg , Smilla’s Sense of Snow

MYSTERIES, Travel Destinations

Cara Black: Paris

Martin Walker: South of France, the Dordogne with his Bruno, Chief of Police

Donna Leon: Venice

Janwillem Van de Wetering: Amsterdam

MYSTERIES, crossed with historical fiction

Jacqueline Winspear: Maisie Dobbs, mostly WW1, English nurse

Todd, Charles: Bess Crawford, WW1 battlefield English nurse (also Inspector Rutledge) “vivid period mystery series” (New York Times Book Review)

Kuhns, Eleanor: Will Rees, weaver, Shaker communities, 1790’s

King, Laurie R.: Mary Russell/ Sherlock Holmes

MYSTERIES, Cape Cod and the Islands  There are lots, but these are the ones we talked about:

Craig, Philip:  The Vineyard, fishing derby, Z

Phoebe Atwood Taylor, Cape Cod in the 1920’s, sleuth Asey Mayo charges along the sandy back roads of the Cape in his roadster

MYSTERY, LIBRARIES (who knew?)

Jenn McKinlay: Due or Die

 

 

Jill’s Picks

The Readers’ Advisory Guide to Mystery by John Charles, Candace Clark, Joanne Hamilton-Selway, and Joanna Morrison. (See how many people it takes to describe what a mystery is!)

The Encyclopedia of Murder and Mystery by Bruce F. Murphy

Arthur and Sherlock: Conan Doyle and the Creation of Holmes by Michael Sims

On Conan Doyle or, The Whole Art of Storytelling by Michael Dirda

Buried Angels by Camilla Lackberg (And the Wellfleet copy is back! And copy should be available very soon!)

Killer Verse: poems of murder and mayhem edited by Harold Schechter and Kurt Brown

Pistols and Petticoats: 175 years of lady detectives in fact and fiction by Erika Janik

Women Crime Writers. Four Suspense Novels of the 1940s edited by Sarah Weinman

Women Crime Writers. Four Suspense Novels of the 1950s edited by Sarah Weinman

The Arvon Book of Crime and Thriller Writing by Michelle Spring and Laurie R. King

The Strand Magazine (Feb.-May 2016 issue has interview with Mark Gatiss, co-creator of Sherlock.)

Listener Picks

Louise Penny mysteries. The first one in the series is Still Life.

Michael Connelly mysteries. The first one in the series is The Black Echo.

Friday Reads: All the Old Knives

This month the FPL Fiction Book Club read an espionage novel entitled All the Old Knives by Olen Steinhauer. This is the fifth espionage novel we have read in a six-month series that began with Joseph Conrad’s The Secret Agent and will end next month with Swimmer by Joakim Zander. One of the first questions, which I was not able to answer the day we discussed the book, was where does the title come from? We all knew about the idea of someone stabbing you in the back, but not about the old knives part. So, after a little investigation, I discovered that in fact this is a quotation by Phædrus from his Fables. It is translated as: “All the old knives that have rusted in my back, I drive in yours.” (By the way, Phædrus also gave us “to add insult to injury.”) Another quotation related question was what was “that old Stalin quote about tragedies and statistics” that is mentioned in the book. That quotation is attributed to Stalin and it is: “A single death is a tragedy, a million deaths is a statistic.”

The most interesting thing to me, as the one person who attends both the Wednesday evening group and the Thursday morning group, was how radically different the two groups responded to the same book! The Wednesday evening group LOVED the book, and the Thursday morning group thought the author (who said it took him just a month to write the novel) should have done at least one more rewrite!

The plot is extraordinarily timely as it involves two CIA officers in Vienna, Henry Pelham and Celia Harrison, who were lovers at the time of a hostage crisis. Celia leaves the CIA and ends up in Carmel-by-the-Sea and Henry has tracked her down to see her one more time, to relive the past, maybe, or to put it behind him once and for all. Most of the novel takes place at a dinner at a restaurant in Carmel-by-the-Sea and the point of view switches between Henry and Celia. The author had the idea of setting this thriller at a restaurant after he watched the Masterpiece dramatization of Christopher Reid’s poem The Song of Lunch, which starred Alan Rickman and Emma Thompson. As he writes in the introduction to the book: “I wondered if I could write an espionage tale that took place entirely around a restaurant table.”

The people that loved the book, loved the pacing, and the story, and the fact that it was a quick read. The people who loathed the book thought there wasn’t enough story, the changing of point of view was too confusing, the character of Celia was unbelievable, and the prose wasn’t engaging enough. EVERYONE agreed that the ending was superb!! This novel is soon to be a major motion picture, so we are all waiting to see how the movie will differ from the novel.

The next meeting of the FPL Fiction Book Club will be March 15th at 7:00 PM or March 16th at 10:00 AM. The book we will be discussing is Swimmer by Joakim Zander, and you can pick up a copy at the Reference Desk.

 

Pants on Fire

* Thank you to FCTV for filming our event. You can watch full coverage of the event below or on Youtube. *

Join us on Wednesday, March 1st  from 7:00 – 8:30 PM in the Hermann Foundation Meeting Room for a discussion about fake news, what it is and how to recognize it, and maybe even a little history of fake news. Joining us will be Allison Butler, U. Mass, Amherst professor and steering committee of Mass Media Literacy, and Sean Corcoran, news director and senior reporter at WCAI in Woods Hole. They will be addressing your concerns through your questions and dialogue.

This program was suggested to us by a library patron who was confused about how best one can identify fake news. We’ll do the best we can to help you understand what it is and how not to spread it around. Please give us a call or send us an e-mail if you would like to attend, so we have an idea of how many chairs to put out! You can contact us at 508-457-2555, ext. 6 or e-mail us at info@falmouthpubliclibrary.org.

Money Books on The Point

Mindy Todd and I were delighted to have author Jacquelyn Mitchard join us on WCAI this morning to talk about books having to do with money. Thanks for all our listener suggestions as well!

 

Jackie’s Picks

Sons and Daughters of Ease and Plenty by Ramonda Ausubel

A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith

Commonwealth by Ann Patchett

Hillbilly Elegy: a memoir of a family and culture in crisis by J. D. Vance

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin

Negroland: a memoir by Margo Jefferson

Minimalism: how to de-clutter, de-stress and simplify your life with simple living by Simeon Lindstrom

Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton (also suggested by listener)

 

Jill’s Picks

The Collected Stories of Lydia Davis by Lydia Davis Try Finances, Money, For Sixty Cents. There is also a story called Cape Cod Diary.

Shapinsky’s Karma, Boggs’s Bills, and other true-life tales by Lawrence Weschler

Wampum and the origins of American Money by Marc Shell

Payback: debt and the shadow side of wealth by Margaret Atwood

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert, translated by Lydia Davis

The Diary of Virginia Woolf by Virginia Woolf, edited by Anne Olivier Bell

Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

Mind Over Money: the psychology of money and how to use it better by Claudia Hammond

Origami with Dollar Bills & Paper Airplanes with Dollar Bills by Duy Nguyen

Plotto: the master book of all plots by William Wallace Cook

 

Listener Suggestions

Bleak House by Charles Dickens

Father Struck it Rich by Evalyn Walsh McLean. Available in the Internet Archive!

Travis McGee series by John D. MacDonald. The first book in the series is The Deep Blue Good-By.

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Reminiscences of a Stock Operator by Edwin Lefèvre. Available online.

Mindfulness, Gratefulness, and Happiness Books on The Point

On today’s book show Mindy Todd, Jill Erickson, and Eric Linder of Yellow Umbrella Books in Chatham encouraged everyone to start the new year reading about and maybe even trying to practice a bit of mindfulness, gratefulness, and happiness. Below is our list of picks and listener picks as well, including a bonus list of books that didn’t make the air, but might interest you. Thanks for listening, and thanks for calling in with your suggestions. Happy New Year! And should you have missed the show on WCAI, you can listen online!

 

Mindy’s Pick

E. B. White on Dogs edited by Martha White

 

Eric’s Picks

Listening Below the Noise: a meditation on the practice of silence by Anne D. LeClaire

Gift From the Sea by Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Chet & Bernie mysteries by Peter Abrahams

“The First Time Percy Came Back” in  Dog Songs: thirty-five dog songs and one essay by Mary Oliver

“The Snakes of September” and “Touch Me” in The Wild Braid: a poet reflects on a century in the garden by Stanley  Kunitz

The Outermost House: a year of life on the great beach of Cape Cod by Henry Beston

 

Jill’s Picks

The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, drawings by Robert Lawson. Read more of the backstory of The Story of Ferdinand at Anita Silvey’s Children’s Book-A-Day Almanac.

An excerpt from War and Peace by  Leo Tolstoy, translated by Richard Pevear & Larissa Volokhonsky

Gratefulness, the Heart of Prayer: an approach to life in fullness by Brother David Steindl-Rast

99 Blessings: an invitation to life by Brother David Steindl-Rast. You might also want to take a look at his web page gratefulness.org and his TED talk.

Wherever You Go There You Are: mindfulness meditation in everyday life by Jon Kabat-Zinn

All the Odes by Pablo Neruda, particularly Ode to Happiness and Ode to the Tomato

The Power of Off: the mindful way to stay sane in a virtual world by Nancy Colier

52 Small Changes for the Mind by Brett Blumenthal

 

Titles For Which There Was No Time Left!

Five little books all by Thich Nhat Hanh, part of a Mindfulness Essentials collection published by Parallax Press:

How to Sit
How to Walk
How to Love
How to Eat
How to Relax

Dancing with Joy: 99 poems edited by Roger Housden

The Book of Joy: lasting happiness in a changing world by His Holiness the Dalai Lama & Archbishop Desmond Tutu with Douglas Abrams

The Lost Art of Reading: why books matter in a distracted time by David L. Ulin

Growing Up Mindful: essential practices to help children, teens, and families find balance, calm, and resilience by Christopher Willard

America the Anxious: how our pursuit of happiness is creating a nation of nervous wrecks by Ruth Whippman

10% Happier: how I tamed the voice in my head, reduced stress without losing my edge, and found self-help that actually works by Dan Harris

 

Listener Picks

How to Meditate by Eknath Easwaren

Last of the Saddle Tramps by Mesannie Wilkins with Mina Titus Sawyer

Animal, Vegetable, Miracle: a year of food life by Barbara Kingsolver

The Fisherman and His Wife: a brand new version by Rosemary Wells (e-mailed to us after we went off the air)

 

North by Northwest

The North Falmouth Branch of the Falmouth Public Library is to be open five days a week!

Beginning on Tuesday, January 3rd the North Falmouth Branch of the Falmouth Public Library, with the help of staff from the West Falmouth Library, will be open five days a week, Monday through Friday for six months.  West Falmouth Library has begun an extensive remodel of their historic 575 West Falmouth Highway building.  It closed on December 12th  and plans are to reopen in June, 2017.  West Falmouth Library is an independent non-profit library corporation and not part of the Falmouth Public Library, but both are members of the regional CLAMS (Cape and Islands Libraries Automated Materials Sharing) library network.  To keep library services readily available for patrons of the West Falmouth Library, the two libraries have agreed to pool their resources.  The North Branch will add Tuesdays and Thursdays to their usual Monday, Wednesday, Friday schedule with the additional hours being staffed by West Falmouth Library personnel.  Laurie McNee, North Falmouth Branch Librarian said, “I have met with the West Falmouth staff and am very excited that we can work together to serve the patrons of both villages and all of Falmouth!”

The new hours for the North Falmouth branch beginning January 3rd will be Mondays and Fridays 2:00 PM to 7:00 PM, Tuesdays and Thursdays 12:00 PM to 5:00 PM, and Wednesdays 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM. The branch is located at 6 Chester Street, North Falmouth, at the intersection of County Road.