We’re Counting the Days until the 2018 Friends of FPL Book Sale!

It is hard to believe, but the 2018 Friends of the Falmouth Public Library Annual Summer Book Sale begins NEXT WEEK! That’s right … on your mark, get ready, go!

Thursday, June 28th, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Friday, June 29th, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Saturday, June 30th, 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM

Sunday, July 1st, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM (Half Price Day)

Monday, July 2nd, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM (Half Price Day)

Tuesday, July 3rd, 10:00 AM to Noon (TEN books for $1.00)

So get your most comfortable shoes on and bring along your biggest bag to fill with book treasures! Don’t forget to tell your friends and relatives about this upcoming summer day of book buying. Also keep your fingers and toes crossed that ALL thunderstorms head off Cape during the book sale. In case you haven’t been to the sale for awhile you should know that the Friends of FPL can now accept credit cards as well as cash.

E-book Changes Coming Soon!

On July 1st, eBooks through Axis360 Will No Longer Be Available as a New Statewide OverDrive Service is Rolled Out

Very soon the Commonwealth eBook Collection (CeC) service available through CLAMS will be changing in an exciting way. On July 1, 2018, as part of this change, the Axis360 eBook service will no longer be offered to CLAMS patrons. The BiblioBoard eBook service will also end.

The OverDrive eBooK and eAudioBook service, currently offering over 26,000 items for borrowing by Falmouth Public Library patrons through CLAMS, will become a new statewide OverDrive service, combining the current collections of several Massachusetts library networks, and additional titles available from a new statewide collection.  At least 90% of currently available Axis 360 items will be in the new OverDrive service. This new ebook service makes statewide sharing of digital library materials truly possible, as has been possible for decades for physical library materials.

To learn more about the OverDrive service , please join Kasia Piasecka, FPL Reference Librarian, on Monday, June 25, 2018 from 10-11 for a training session on using OverDrive More information

Axis360 Users:  Your holds or borrowed items from Commonwealth eBook Collections will disappear from your device on July 1, 2018.  Please use the CLAMS OverDrive  service:clamsnet.overdrive.com

Friday Reads: Making Lemonade Out of Lemons

This is the story of a book not being what we expected the book to be! When we ordered a copy of Cape Cod Notebook: an alternative guidebook to the beaches of Cape Cod by Betsy Medvedovsky, I suppose we were anticipating something in the vein of Robert Finch’s A Cape Cod Notebook, only focusing on beaches. How wrong we were! It turned out that the alternative guidebook was sort of a Cape Cod beach journal, where the person reading the book was also writing it! There was a list of beaches on the Cape, with some basic information on each one, and then a blank page for the beach goer to fill in with his or her own reflections on the beach. So the conundrum was, what does a public library do with a book that is essentially blank pages? We noticed that we weren’t the only Cape library that had ordered it, and some had already withdrawn it when they saw what it was. Others put big stickers in the front saying that this was a library book, and thus you were not to write in it. We decided to take a different approach, and turn it into a writing project.

So … we added a note that you see when you open the book which reads:

 

“This book is unique.
Why?
Because we are inviting
YOU to help write in it.
Please share your beach day with
everyone. Tell us about the view …
the sand … the waves …
Was the bird watching good? How about
sharks, boats, surfers, crowds?
Thank you for your thoughtful
comments. They just might inspire
someone to discover a new
favorite Cape Cod beach!”

And then we sent the book out into the world. It just returned to us briefly, so that we could check on our experiment, and it is working!! Here is one reader’s thoughts on Chapoquoit Beach in Falmouth:

“One of our favorite spots when we visit our family in Falmouth. Grandkids love the long expanse of shallow water. Surf on windy days can be great fun! Kite boarders provide excitement too. Shells & rocks abound, and the sand is soft & perfect for building castles and digging deep holes. We love it!”

So if you check out this book, be sure to write in it! And when it is full, we plan to add it to our Local History Collection in the Reference Room.

Summer Reading on The Point with Mindy Todd

Today’s show was pre-recorded, so if you have some great suggestions for summer reading just let us know, and we’ll add them to this list. It was a joy to have Mary Fran Buckley, co-owner of Eight Cousins Bookshop, join us for this show, and we look forward to having her return. You can read the summer reading article from the Falmouth Enterprise here.

Mary Fran’s Picks

The Shell Seekers by Rosamund Pilcher

A Town Like Alice by Neville Schute

Death at La Fenice by Donna Leon

Bruno, Chief of Police by Martin Walker

We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid by Bill Bryson

In the Garden of Beasts:love, terror, and an American family in Hitler’s Berlin by Erik Larson

 

Jill’s Picks

Florine Stettheimer: Painting Poetry by Stephen Brown and Georgiana Uhlyarik. The autobiography of Virgil Thomson first introduced me to the Stettheimer sisters. Head to page 308 in the Library of America volume The State of Music & other writings for a great introduction to these astonishing sisters. The autobiography itself is a great read. As Thomson writes: “The sisters were three — Ettie, Florine, and Carrie — all of uncertain age; and they lived with their invalid mother in the most ornate apartment house I have ever seen — a florid Gothic structure called Alwyn Court, at Fifty-eighth Street and Seventh Avenue.”

The House at Lobster Cove by Jane Goodrich. Background on this novel courtesy of Fine Books & Collections Magazine.

Cape Cod Notebook: an alternative guidebook to the beaches of Cape Cod by Betsy Medvedovsky

A Cape Cod Notebook by Robert Finch

A Cape Cod Notebook 2 by Robert Finch

The Pisces by Melissa Broder. List of ten mermaid books perfect for the beach by Matt Staggs.

Collected Millar: the master at her zenith by Margaret Millar. (Includes her novel Beast in View.) While you are waiting for a CLAMS library to order the Collected Millar, try Women Crime Writers: four suspense novels of the 1950s which also includes Beast in View!

Murder in the Manuscript Room by Con Lehane

Widow’s Wreath by Cynthia Riggs

The Blazing World by Siri Hustvedt

Bellewether by Susanna Kearsley

Look at the photo on this page closely, and you’ll find some books that we didn’t have time for! It does seem that I always bring more books than we need out of an abundant fear of dead radio air!

 

Dreams and Dreaming on The Point

Below you’ll find the book list for today’s book show with Mindy Todd, Peter Abrahams and Jill Erickson. Miss the show? You can listen to the entire show online. Here are the links to the two videos that Peter mentioned:
Peter’s Picks
The Mind at Night by Andrea Rock
Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming Stephen LaBerge and Howard Rheingold
A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak
1984  by George Orwell
Misery by Stephen King
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Not Enough Time For …
A Fistful of Collars by Spencer Quinn (includes a dog dream, Peter told me after the show)
The Wizard of Oz by Frank L. Baum
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Jill’s Picks
Rebecca by Daphne Du Maurier
“Dreams” by Mark Strand in his Collected Poems
This is Dali by Catherine Ingram with illustrations by Andrew Rae
The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry
From the Forest: a search for the hidden roots of our fairy tales by Sara Maitland (Includes chapter “The Dreams of Sleeping Beauty”)
Lucid Dreaming: a concise guide to awakening in your dreams and in your life by Stephen LaBerge (includes CD on guided dream practices)
Not Enough Time For …
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy (but here is a great article on dreams in the novel.)
Clarissa, or the History of a Young Lady by Samuel Richardson (If she had only listened to her dream, she would have avoided Lovelace entirely!)
Snooze: The Lost Art of Sleep by Michael McGirr (In which you learn, among many other things, that “experts have counted two hundred or more reference to sleep in the work of William Shakespeare” and that the word for fear of dreams is oneirophobia.

We Won a Book Bike!

While at the recent Public Library Association Conference in Philadelphia, Jennifer Woodward, Assistant Director, won a social media raffle for a Book Bike for the library. We just had to tweet the phrase #LibrariansOnARoll, and post a photo of the book bike. We did that! And much to our amazement, we just got word that the Falmouth Public Library was the winner of the raffle!

We also attended a workshop at the Public Library Association Conference about how other public libraries are using their book bikes. We were particularly excited by what the Berkeley Public Library was doing with their book bike. They call it the Library on Wheels and not only check out materials, but also have a mobile hotspot where people can connect to their wireless connection.

Our new bicycle is a specially designed cargo bike, sort of a backwards tricycle, and is being custom built for the library. The staff is very excited about possibilities for getting out of the library this summer. We hope to have it by early July. Until July, we’ll be brainstorming ideas for using the bike. Look for us a Surf Drive Beach and Falmouth Commodores games and we hope many other places this summer! We’ll keep you posted, and would love to hear where you might want to see the library bicycle.

Dive Into the Ocean with Us!

Ready to read some great novels about the ocean? Novels that will take you from April right into beach season? Then join the Books on the Half Shell book group at the library for six great reads. You even get your choice of morning or night sessions. We meet at 7:00 PM on the third Wednesday of the month and at 10:00 AM the Thursday morning after. Books are available to check out at the Reference Desk. This series of book discussions includes:

The Cat’s Table by Michael Ondaatje

Claire of the Sea Light by Edwidge Danticant

The Lifeboat by Charlotte Rogan

Mermaids in Paradise by Lydia Millet

To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

The Lightkeeper’s Wife by Sarah Anne Johnson

Our first discussion will be on April 18th at 7:00 PM or April 19th at 10:00 AM. Take your pick!

 

2018 Friends of the Falmouth Public Library Book Sale

It has been a long winter, in fact it seems that spring has already been a long winter! However, we have something for everyone to look forward to … the Friends of the Falmouth Public Library Annual Summer Book Sale! That’s right, the dates and times have been posted, and here they are …

Thursday, June 28th, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Friday, June 29th, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Saturday, June 30th, 10:00 AM to 6:00 PM

Sunday, July 1st, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM

Monday, July 2nd, 10:00 AM to 4:00 PM (Half Price Day)

Tuesday, July 3rd, 10:00 AM to Noon (FIVE books for $1.00)

So mark your calendars, tell your friends and relatives, and start dreaming of a summer day of book buying!

Top Ten Books, Part Two, on The Point

Today we did part two of our top ten favorite books.  Bob Waxler, recently retired English professor from U. Mass, Dartmouth, joined Mindy and me for the monthly book show on WCAI’s  The Point. Our topic was the second half of our top ten favorite books. As it happened, it was also pledge week at WCAI, which may account for our not having any callers today. However, if you missed the show, you can always listen to it online, in fact even if you DID listen to the show this morning, you will have missed the very end which we had to record after we were off the air. You can always listen online! To read about our first top five books head over to this blog entry.

Jill Erickson, Head of Reference & Adult Services

 

Bob’s Picks

Middlemarch by George Eliot

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

Frankenstein, or, The modern prometheus by Mary Shelley

Night by Elie Wiesel

Going to Meet the Man by James Baldwin

 

Jill’s Picks

Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White, pictures by Garth Williams

Martha Quest by Doris Lessing

A Writer’s Diary by Virginia Woolf  (or read ALL of her diaries!)

Finding Time Again by Marcel Proust. Not currently available in CLAMS, but feel free to read any Proust. Or you could try reading about people reading Proust as seen in the New York Times.

The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf, drawings by Robert Lawson

And if you want to know other people’s top ten books, try My Ideal Bookshelf with art by Jane Mount and edited by Thessaly La Force. Fascinating lists in part because all sorts of people suggested titles, typeface designers, architects, musicians, filmmakers, athletes, chefs, as well as writers.

 

Listener Pick

We got an e-mail from a listener after we were off the air. He writes: “I respectfully wish to add a few plays to the must read books mentioned in today’s Point, perhaps Shakespeare’s Othello — and certainly one or two from George Bernard Shaw, perhaps drawn from Pygmalion, Major Barbara, and Mrs. Warren’s Profession. All remain extremely relevant with issues that still speak to us, and the Shaw plays are all exceptional and entertaining reads.

 

 

Poster Exhibit Celebrating International Women’s Day

Organizations in many countries use posters as a way to communicate ideas and messages with their audience. They are posted on walls, fences, and poles all over a city. Unions sometimes hang posters in work places to warn of dangers, educate about benefits or inspire action. Posters often rely on creative art to communicate the idea. Posters are also an art form that is easily accessible to people.

International Women’s Day first emerged from the activities of labor movements at the turn of the twentieth century in North America and across Europe. In 1975, during International Women’s Year, the United Nations began celebrating International Women’s Day on March 8.

Each year, around the world, International Women’s Day (IWD) is now celebrated on March 8th. Hundreds of events occur not just on this day but throughout the month of March to mark the economic, political and social achievements of women.

1909: The first National Woman’s Day was observed in the United States on February 28. The Socialist Party of America designated this day in honor of the 1908 garment workers’ strike in New York, where women protested against working conditions.

1910: The Socialist International, meeting in Copenhagen, established a Women’s Day, international in character, to honor the movement for women’s rights and to build support for achieving universal suffrage for women. The proposal was greeted with unanimous approval by the conference of over 100 women from 17 countries, which included the first three women elected to the Finnish Parliament.

1911: As a result of the Copenhagen initiative, International Women’s Day was marked for the first time (March 19) in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland, where more than one million women and men attended rallies. In addition to the right to vote and to hold public office, they demanded women’s rights to work, to vocational training and to an end to discrimination on the job.

1913-1914: International Women’s Day also became a mechanism for protesting World War I. As part of the peace movement, Russian women observed their first International Women’s Day on the last Sunday in February. Elsewhere in Europe, on or around March 8th of the following year, women held rallies either to protest the war or to express solidarity with other activists.

1917: Against the backdrop of the war, women in Russia again chose to protest and strike for ‘Bread and Peace’ on the last Sunday in February which fell on March 8 on the Gregorian calendar. Four days later, the Czar abdicated and the provisional Government granted women the right to vote.

1945: The Charter of the United Nations was the first international agreement to affirm the principle of equality between women and men.

Posters celebrating International Women’s Day are currently on display in the Falmouth Public Library through March 27th. This collection of posters are from a greater collection of more than 7,100 of Stephen Lewis. He is a long-time activist in the labor movement, and the former Treasurer of his union. Stephen has exhibited at a number of public libraries in Massachusetts, Boston City Hall, and two of the state Heritage parks. He has presented at the annual conference of the National Council on Public History, and on some cable television programs. The posters were contributed by friends, collected at conferences, through visits to some of the organizations, and from connections made through the internet.

This project is supported in part by grants from the Mashpee and Falmouth Cultural Councils, local agencies which are supported by the Massachusetts Cultural Council, a state agency, and by Laborer’s Local 1249.