Friday Reads: Unseen: Unpublished Black History

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

 

On this final Friday of Black History Month, Friday Reads is highlighting Unseen:  Unpublished Black History from the New York Times Photo Archives by Times photo editor, Darcy Eveleigh, and three colleagues, Dana Canedy, Damien Cave and Rachel L. Swarns.  The book is born from the highly popular New York Times series, “Unpublished Black History,” that ran in February, 2016 both in print and online.  “It garnered millions of views on The Times website and thousands of comments from readers,” the inside flap states.  Eveleigh discovered dozens of unpublished photos of black history in The Times archive and together with Canedy, Cave and Swarns researched the back stories.

Unseen showcases those photographs and digs even deeper into The Times’s archives to include 175 photographs and stories behind them in this extraordinary collection.  Among the entries is a 27-year-old Jesse Jackson leading an anti-discrimination rally in Chicago; Rosa Parks arriving at a Montgomery courthouse in Alabama; a candid shot of Aretha Franklin backstage at the Apollo Theater; Ralph Ellison on the streets of his Manhattan neighborhood; the fire-bombed home of Malcom X; Myrlie Evers and her children at the funeral of her slain husband, Medgar; a wheelchair-bound Roy Campanella at the razing of Ebbets Field; a behind-the-scenes- photo shoot with Arthur A. Mitchell, cofounder of the Dance Theatre of Harlem, and his principal dancers; images of peaceful and organized demonstrators at Resurrection City in 1968 that contrast the photographs of disorder and theft dominating the coverage of the time; and  series by Don Hogan Charles, the first black photographer hired by The Times, capturing life in Harlem in the 1960s.” (Inner flap).

This book can be found on the new nonfiction book shelf with call number 973.0496 UNS

 

Pictured:  cover and pps. 96-97 “Arthur Mitchell, Dancing Through Barriers”

TAXES: IMPORTANT NEWS for PAPER FILERS

To increase the headache for tax filers using paper forms and instructions, this year the IRS has sent out two important notices about changes since materials were printed.  Please take note of the following:

 

Notice 1437 (February, 2018)
In a nutshell, the notice states that the most up-to-date forms are on the government website, irs.gov and that print forms already dispersed may or may not still be current.

 

Correction to the 2017 Instructions for Form 1040
This correction is for one line in “the Worksheet To See if You Should Fill in For 6251–Line 45”. 

 

In addition, our supply of Massachusetts resident booklets is almost gone.  We are limited to requesting only one additional box, which we have done.   The arrival time is unknown.  When the supply runs out, we will not be able to get any more paper copies.  Paper forms and the booklet can be printed out from the state government website, mass.gov/dor or you can file online using MassTax Connect, a secure website, new this year, also located at mass.gov/dor.

If you need to print paper forms or instructions, there is a designated computer in the reference room for patrons to use.  Black and white prints are 20¢ a page and color prints are 40¢ a page.  Print outs are single-sided only.  Payment is in cash only – no checks, debit or credit cards accepted.  You do not need a library card to print.

You may have noticed that for the past several years the federal and state governments have been making it increasing difficult for tax payers to file their taxes using paper forms and instructions.  Their goal is to get everyone to file online.  Filing online is cheaper, faster and more accurate, with faster refunds as a bonus.  First, beginning years ago, they stopped providing forms and instructions to Post Offices.  They were distributed only through tax offices and public libraries.  Then, they reduced the types of materials available to libraries from the thirty or so forms and instructions we used to get, to simply the basics: 1040, 1040A and 1040 EZ forms and instructions.  Now, both the federal and state governments are severally limiting the number of copies we receive.   Be on the lookout for any possible future amendments to tax forms.  If we learn of any, we’ll post another blog.

 

 

Friday Reads: African American Folktales

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

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In celebration of Black History Month, this week I am highlighting a beautiful new book we recently added to the collection, The Annotated African American Folktales, edited and with a forward, introduction and notes by Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar.  It joins other wonderfully designed annotated books of classic American literature from W. W. Norton and Co., such as The Annotated Alice, The Annotated Huckleberry Finn (which I put on in staff picks collection a few years ago) and The Annotated Uncle Tom’s Cabin, to name only a few.

 

The inner flap states, “Drawing from the great folklorists of the past while expanding African American lore with dozens of tales rarely seen before, The Annotated African American Folktales revolutionizes the canon like no other volume. ( …)  acclaimed scholars, Henry Louis Gates Jr. and Maria Tatar assemble a groundbreaking collection of folktales, myths and legends that revitalizes a vibrant African American past to produce the most comprehensive and ambitious collection of African American folktales ever published in American literary history.  Arguing for the value of these deceptively simple stories as part of a sophisticated, complex, and heterogeneous cultural heritage, Gates and Tatar show how these remarkable stories deserve a place alongside the classic works of African American literature, and American literature more broadly.”

With this book you will make sense of the world with Anansi, figure out dilemmas with a variety of tales, read of enchantment and wisdom in fairy tales and enjoy many stories of flying Africans, magic instruments, witches, hants and spooks, talking skulls and singing tortoises.  The Tar-Baby and Uncle Remus are well represented and one section features folktales collected by Zora Neale Hurston.  This isn’t all, there is a section of tales about John and old master, ballads about heroes, outlaws and monkey business and preacher tales as well.

The essays, annotations and assorted photos, drawings and other illustrations combine to provide illuminating context for these “deceptively simple stories,” making The Annotated African American Folktales a real treasury.  You can find this book on the new nonfiction shelf with the call number 398.208996 ANN.

 

Friday Reads: Ocean Echoes

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

This week, I’m highlighting a Staff Pick from a staff member who is also a free-lance writer on the side, so I figure she knows a well-written book when she reads one.  And, with full disclosure in mind, she is married into the MBL-WHOI* community of scientists in Woods Hole.  Our book this week is Ocean Echoes, a novel by Sheila Hurst.

Our staff member writes, “Sheila Hurst, local author and long-time WHOI employee describes the research world of oceanographers – with a fictional setting closely resembling Woods Hole, Ocean Echoes takes you on board a research vessel bound for distant seas.   Interesting plot developments tell the tale of an ocean that we all should be concerned about.”

From the back cover:  “Marine biologist Ellen Upton gives up on love to study jellyfish.  Her ultimate goal is to make a difference through her research, but the ocean would rather mystify than reveal its secrets.  When her funding is threatened, her future will depend on the success or failure of an upcoming research cruise.  During the cruise, she discovers what could be a new species.  Every discovery only leads to more questions.  She is driven to learn the truth behind its existence, even as the truth continues to change.  Either her dreams of recognition are within her grasp or her research is slipping into obsession. – Reverberating with mysteries of life and love, Ocean Echoes is a journey into the unknown.  A percentage from the sale of this book will go toward nonprofit organizations working to protect the world’s oceans for future generations.”

You can find this self-published book on the Staff Picks shelf, near the new self-checkout station.

 

*Marine Biological Laboratory – Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

 

 

 

Friday Reads: Small Pets

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

 

If you have a small pet or are thinking of getting one, you should know about a wonderful little book we recently added to our collection … The Illustrated Practical Guide to Small Pets and Pet Care by David Alderton

The inner flap states:  “This expertly written guide looks at small mammals – including rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils and jirds [Yes, that is correct, a jird is a gerbil-like animal.], chinchillas, rats and mice – as well as birds, herptiles [Yes again, herptiles is a group that inlcudes reptiles and amphibians.], invertebrates, and fish. Each chapter features popular breeds from within each species, based on a availability and suitability for a domestic home-life.  There is detailed advice on how to choose the best pet for your lifestyle and which species are the most suitable for younger children, as well as practical tips for what to look for when buying a pet; suitable housing and exercise; foods for a balanced diet; pet health and how to respond when your pet is sick.”

This book is sure to be popular once word gets out.  You can find it on the new nonfiction shelf with the call # 636.0887 ALD.

Valentine’s day is coming up.  Please be a responsible pet owner and do not surprise someone with a pet for a gift.  Rabbits and love birds may seem like a cute idea, but if the new owner is not emotionally invested and prepared to take care of a surprise pet, it will likely be neglected or even abused.  This book will let you know what you can expect with small pet ownership so you can make an educated decision about which type of pet will be right for you.

 

 

Friday Reads: Paleo Magazine

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

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Did you make a new year’s resolution to improve your health?  Are you curious about the paleo diet?  If you answered yes to either question, you ought to take a look at Paleo magazine in our reading area.

Their mission statement is, “Paleo magazine was founded with the purpose of providing readers with the information they need to live strong, vibrant, healthy lives.  We are dedicated to partnering with leaders in the Paleo community to spread the knowledge of ancestral health principles, without the influence of Big Pharma or Big Agriculture.”   The magazine promotes eating real food, such as vegetables, wild fish, seafood and game, grass-fed meats, eggs, healthy fats, fruits, nuts & seeds, and avoiding processed foods, refined sugar, legumes & soy, grains and dairy.

To that end, Paleo contains many regular features that guide the reader to a well-rounded, healthy lifestyle, and several “highlight” articles.  Check out these regular columns you will find in each bimonthly issue:

Research Roundup: a summary and analysis of research done on topics of interest to the paleo community by a registered dietician.

Herbs for Thriving:  Each issue features one herb. The February/March 2018 issue features plantain.  Did you know traditional uses for this herb include a poultice, spray or salve for insect bites, acne and other skin irritations?  You can also make tea and cough syrup with it.

Product Reviews:  From food to gadgets, you can read brief reviews for several products.  Unlike Consumer Reports, they do not make their acquisition of products or testing methods known.

Book Corner: Read author interviews here.  Books are about a variety of topics related to “strong, vibrant, healthy lives.”

Blog Review:  Reviews of paleo-related blogs and websites, including interviews with the bloggers.

Business Spotlight: features a business of interest to the paleo community, such as “Kimera Coffee” in the February/March 2018 issue.

Foraging:  features one plant each issue that can be harvested from the wild.

From the Doc: A doctor explains a current medical topic, citing studies and providing connections to our daily lives.

Real Talk with Dietician Cassie: Like “From the Doc,” but focusing on nutrition and written by a registered dietician.

Recipes:  Lots of recipes with scrumptious photos and instructions suitable for a beginner covering breakfast, lunch, dinner … and dessert.

Average Joe Paleo: A personal column reflecting an issue readers are likely to identify with.

Movement: Features a few exercises, stretches or massages.

 

You can find Paleo magazine in our reading room shelved alphabetically by its title.  Back issues can be checked out.

2-Day Crochet

We are very pleased to welcome back Falmouth crochet instructor, Kali Smith.  Kali will lead two 2-day workshops where she will instruct crocheters on how to make a basket using bulky yarn and the magic circle technique.  All materials will be supplied, thanks to the generosity of the Trustees of the Falmouth Public Library.   Finished baskets will be approximately 7” tall and 9” in diameter and will be perfect for storing your yarn.

Participants will be expected to work on the basket at home between meetings and must already know how to:

  • crochet in the round
  • single crochet
  • chain stitch
  • slip stitch

The 2-day workshop will be offered twice, at the following dates and times:

Saturday mornings:  March 3 and March 10 from 9:30 – 11:00 AM

Wednesday nights:  March 28 and April 4 from 6:30 – 8:00 PM

All meetings will take place at the Falmouth Public Library, 300 Main St. Falmouth, in the Trustees Room.

You may register for either the Saturday workshop or the Wednesday workshop.  To register, please contact the reference department at 508-457-2555 x 6 or stop by the reference desk where you can see a sample basket. You can also register online at falmouthpubliclibrary.org/register.

Friday Reads: The Right to Die

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

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Have you read Atul Gawande’s Being Mortal:  medicine and what matters in the end during our town-wide read this year?  Are you following along with the stories in the local newspapers about a Falmouth doctor fighting for the legal right to end his life because he is terminally ill?   If you have an interest in the complex issue of physician assisted death or euthanasia and want to learn more about it, I recommend a reference book recently added to our collection:  The Right to Die by Howard Ball.

As part of the series of reference books called Contemporary World Issues, The Right to Die is written for students in high school and college working on research papers, as well as activists, policy makers and yes, general readers.  It provides reliable, balanced and current information from a wealth of sources in a clear manner.  The publisher writes about the series, “Each book, carefully organized and easy to use, contains an overview of the subject, a detailed chronology, biographical sketches, facts and data and/or documents and other primary source material, a forum of authoritative perspective essays, annotated lists of print and non-print resources, and an index.  Readers of books in the Contemporary World Issues series will find the information they need in order to have a better understanding of the social, political, environmental, and economic issues facing the world today.”

For example, the “Profiles” section contains entries for people and organizations grouped according to whether they support or are opposed to Death with Dignity Laws.  Each entry provides a brief background of the person’s role and opinion on the issue, as well as other helpful information.  The entry for Atul Gawande, which is among the longest entries, states: “… his writing about how one should approach death is extraordinarily beautiful; any person interested in exploring the parameters of the right to die – regardless of the person’s predisposition – will do well to read Gawande’s ethical-medical philosophy of death and dying.”

You can find this book in the reference department with call # REF 179.7 BAL.  It cannot be checked out, but you can spend as much time with it as you like in one of our easy chairs by the window.

 

Friday Reads: My Green Manifesto

 

“Friday Reads” is a weekly blog written by reference librarian Faith Lee about great books, magazines, and the occasional reference work.    Topics may be new titles added to the library, selections from the Staff Picks shelf or about something she recently read.  Admittedly, there is a definite slant toward nonfiction, because, well, she’s a reference librarian and likes to learn new things.  Guest bloggers take a turn sometimes too.  No matter the source, good reads are featured here. 

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The January meeting of the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club was post-poned one week due to the snow storm on the 4th.  We had a fine time yesterday, however, discussing and guffawing over My Green Manifesto:  down the Charles River in pursuit of a new environmentalism by one-time Cape Cod resident, David Gessner.

The publisher describes the book thus, “In My Green Manifesto, David Gessner embarks on a rough-and-tumble journey down Boston’s Charles River, searching for the soul of a new environmentalism.  With a tragically leaky canoe, a broken cell phone, a cooler of beer, and the environmental planner Dan Driscoll in tow, Gessner grapples with the stereotype of the environmentalist as an overzealous, puritanical mess.”

We covered many topics in our discussion, including ‘what is a manifesto?’  and noting the literary tradition from which this work stems (Think Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Edward Abbey, John Hay, Aldo Leopold, Bill McKibben, Wendell Berry and Rachel Carson.)  We also compared the author’s “new” environmentalism with older doomsday-style “environmental extremists” (Think Al Gore and the author’s favorite antagonists Ted Nordhouse and Michael Shellenberger.) Gessner’s “new” environmentalism is an approachable method rooted in having fun in the wildness and fixing what ails your own backyard.  It may also include beer.

Since we are in the midst of reading a series of books about social justice issues, we made sure to tie the book into the theme.  Climate change is responsible for drought, water shortages, floods, extreme weather, crop failures and a host of other calamities which strike the poor the hardest.

Next month we will discuss Glass House: the 1% economy and the shattering of the all-American town by Brian Alexander.  Pick up a copy of the book at the reference desk and join us in the Hermann Room on Thursday, February 1 at 10:00 for what is sure to be an illuminating and engaging discussion.

 

From Book to Golden Globe

Will you be watching the 75th Golden Globe awards on Sunday, January 7th?

Here are a few  book suggestions to enhance your viewing!

Among the nominees for Best Picture are:

Call Me by Your Name –  Check out the novel of the same name by André Aciman,

Dunkirk – Borrow the book: Dunkirk: the history behind the major motion picture by Joshua Levine

The Post –Borrow the book, Katharine Graham- a Personal History

Nominees for Best Actress- Drama

Jessica Chastain for Molly’s Game 

Borrow the book –Molly’s Game: the true story of the 26-Year-old Woman behind the most exclusive, high-stakes underground poker game in the world

Michelle Williams for All the Money in the World-

Borrow the book- Uncommon Youth: the gilded life and tragic times of J. Paul Getty III by Charles Fox

Nominees for Best Actor- Drama 

Gary Oldman for Darkest Hour

Borrow the bookDarkest Hour: how Churchill brought England back from the brink by Anthony McCarten

Nominees for Best Musical or Comedy

The Disaster Artist

Borrow the book- The Disaster Artist: my life inside The Room, the greatest bad movie ever made by Greg Sestero & Tom Bissell

Greatest Showman     

Borrow the book- P.T. Barnum: America’s greatest showman by Philip B. Kunhardt, Jr., Philip B. Kunhardt III, and Peter W. Kunhardt

I, Tonya

Borrow the book- Fire on Ice: The Exclusive Inside Story of Tonya Harding by Abby Haight

Judi Dench- Victoria & Abdul

Borrow the book: Victoria & Abdul: the true story of the queen’s closest confidant by Shrabani Basu

Nominees for Best Actor in a Motion Picture- Musical or Comedy

Steve Carell- Battle of the Sexes

Borrow the book- A Necessary Spectacle: Billie Jean King, Bobby Riggs, and the tennis match that leveled the game by Selena Roberts